Parenthesis in exeption constructors/class constructors

Ah hello.

Suppose I have a very very simple program:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class NormalClass
{
public:
      NormalClass() { cout << "NormalClass\n"; }
};

class ExceptionClass
{
public:
      ExceptionClass() { cout << "ExceptionClass\n"; }
};

int main()
{
      NormalClass a(); <----------------(1)
      try {
           throw (ExceptionClass()); <---(2)
      } catch (const ExceptionClass& ex) {
           cout << "Caught!\n";
      }
      return 0;
}

Now, when I leave the code as-is, I do not get the call to NormalClass being caried out.  This is proven by the lack of "NormalClass" in the output.  However, when I create a new ExceptionClass object, as in (2), with exactly the same semantics, *including the parentheses*, I get the output "ExceptionClass", showing that the constructor is being called.

If I remove the parentheses in (1) changing the line to

NormalClass a;

the output is as excepted.  So,

1) I know that if I leave the () off, the compiler assumes it is a function definition, but that does not explain why I can leave the parameters off or add them on (the output being the same either case) if I state

NormalClass* a = new NormalClass();

OR

NormalClass* a = new NormalClass;

And which is better form ?  No parentheses or parentheses ?

2) What is the crack with exceptions then ?  Why do I need to include them when creating an exception class object to be thrown ?

Thanks in advance.
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mrwad99Asked:
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efnCommented:
When you declare a, you are saying "let there be a."

NormalClass a;

says "let there be a NormalClass named a."

NormalClass a(0);

says "let there be a NormalClass named a and initialize it with 0."

NormalClass a(int);

says "there is a function a that takes an int parameter and returns a NormalClass."

NormalClass a();

To be consistent with the interpretations above, this could mean either "let there be a NormalClass a and give it default initialization" or "there is a function a that takes no parameter and returns a NormalClass."  The syntax rules specify the second interpretation.

The operand of the new operator is not a declaration.  The object the new operator creates does not have a name.  The operand specifies the type of the object to create and optionally specifies an initializer for the object.

NormalClass* a = new NormalClass;

creates an unnamed NormalClass with default initialization.

NormalClass* a = new NormalClass(0);

creates an unnamed NormalClass and initializes it with 0.

NormalClass* a = new NormalClass();

also creates an unnamed NormalClass with default initialization.  Because the parentheses follow the typename "NormalClass" and not an identifier like "a", it doesn't look like a function declaration, not that a function declaration could follow "new" anyway.

I personally prefer the form without parentheses for default initialization, but that's just a matter of taste, not function.

The new operator expects a type and possibly an initializer.  A throw statement expects an object.  When you write "NormalClass()" as an operand to new, you are not creating a temporary NormalClass object to be the operand, you are telling the new operator how to construct an object.  When you write "NormalClass()" as an operand to throw, you are creating a temporary object of class NormalClass with default initialization.  The parentheses are necessary to tell the compiler that you want a temporary object; if you just wrote "NormalClass", you would be referring to the NormalClass type, not an object.

--efn
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mrwad99Author Commented:
Marvelous.  Many thanks !
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