Separated internal IPs for D-Link hardware router

I purchased a D-Link 704p router to replace a software router (router-on-disk, based on a linux kernel). When I plugged and configured the new router, I realized that it didn't work the same way that the software router. First, I received an IP number dynamically (dhcp) from my ISP, took it into a NIC, and got 2 internet connections for my workstations:

_____________________________________192.168.1.254
_______________192.168.0.1 -> switch1 -> LTSP server1 & clients
200.74.184.56 -> router
_______________192.168.1.1 -> switch2 -> LTSP server2 & clients
_____________________________________192.168.1.254

This way I had 2 separated networks (logically and physically), and that is what I need.

Things were doing fine, but I thought I could have a faster internet speed on client machines. When i received more budget, i bought a D-LInk 704p hardware router, installed it, and it didn't work like my software router, because this stupid machine assigns the same internal IP address to its 4 lan ports. What can i do?

At this time, all machines are running on the same net (router is set to 192.168.0.1), so I cannot set up a second LTSP server with thin clients, and had to move to Win98 machines. Other way, clients of my second server couldn't find it, and switched to the first one. If you don't know, LTSP works with network boot via tftp, using dhcp to detect and choose clients from their MACs. It's an excellent choice for slow, pentium class machines.

a) How can i configure D-Link to have separated IP addresses on each LAN ports?
b) Is there any hardware router than can do so?
c) Is there any other solution to separate into 2 LTSP networks, and improve performance?

I've been surfing D-Link's web site, but there's no reference to this problem, it seems to be "natural" to share the same internal IP address for the 4 LAN ports.

Sorry about the grammar, thanks folks
jecelisAsked:
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svenkarlsenCommented:
Hi jecelis,

just to clear up a minor misunderstanding here: the router your're talking about here (like most of the similar products) doesn't have 4 LAN-ports: it's got 1 LAN-port integrated with a 4-port switch.

So much for that: if you want two subnets serving machines running only network boot, you will need at router, - no way around that. But it doesn't have to be anything big: a small 486/66 MHz will quite a lot of traffic if it's slimmed down and all other functionality is removed.

An alternative solution would be to let one of the servers act as a router, - depends on the amount of traffic you're handling, but if the server can survive being a net-boot server, I think it should be able to handle that as well.

Kind regards,
Sven


Kind regards,
Sven
0
jecelisAuthor Commented:
I understand that I could move back to a software or OS routing based solution (as you suggested: one LTSP server as router, or dedicating a slow machine).

My first try, using one fast machine as LTSP server AND as router, couldn't handle more than 7 pentium class machines whithout going down (users generate a big amount of traffic, they surf, play on line and chat a lot). That's why I set up a software router.

What gets me mad is that I bought a D-Link 704p, this device is named "router", with ports described as 1 "WAN" and 4 "LAN", so I supposed that at least it could behave like my prior software router, connecting 2 different switches with 2 different LTSP servers and 2 groups of clients.

I believe there should be a way to replace a software router with a hardware router wich assigns separated internal IPs to its LAN ports. I just want to know if my d-link 704p can be configurated this way, or i have to sell it, put some more money, and buy other router (other brand and model).
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svenkarlsenCommented:
jecelis,

there is no way you can set up individual IP on the four ports of your router.

Sven
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jecelisAuthor Commented:
That takes me to other question:

Can I connect the router's 4 "lan" ports to the same switch to increase bandwidth? The switch is a 3Com, can be stacked from any port to other 3Com switch. I haven't tried before because there's no info about doing so.
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svenkarlsenCommented:
jecelis,

for the convenience of all using this forum, we try to keep everything concentrated, in order to achieve best results from searching the database.

This means that each thread should stick to one question. If a question leads to new questions, it means you have been enlightended and are ready to move on, - i.e. we have served our purpose.

If you feel you haven't got a clear answer to your question,, please post a 0-point question in the Community Services reclaiming your points for this question.

Kind regards,
Sven
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