Desktop folder redirection, file deletion on the desktop not move into Recycle bin

In Windows Server 2003, after some workstations join the domain and setup the "Folder Redirection" for the desktop folder in the default group policy, suppose I login in the workstation and I have a file on the desktop but we mistakenly delete it, the file is not moved into the recycle bin, instead the file seems to be permanently deleted.  I want to ask is that, is there any way to make the deletion more safe, that is, when we delete a file on the desktop, it moves to the recycle bin first such that I can do the clean up the recycle bin procedure later?

Note that if we do the "Folder Redirection" for the "My document" folder, and if we delete the file in the "My document" folder, the deleted file will move to the recycle bin first.  Only the folder redirection for "desktop folder" does not follow this rule.
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akumanovaAsked:
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ShineOnCommented:
I think - and this is just my interpretation - that redirection of the desktop folder should be done in read-only mode.  People shouldn't be deleting stuff from the desktop folder, or putting documents into the desktop folder, because that is where your program links are.

The "My Documents" folder redirection would take the attributes normally expected of a local document-storage folder, which includes having deletions go to recycle bin, but the desktop folder, IMHO, is a special type of special folder that if used with a redirectioin policy should be set read-only.

Just my $.02  -  I'm sure there will be a few different opinions from mine...  Just keep in mind that what I'm saying here is my opinion of "should."  The scope of "should" is much narrower than the scope of "can."
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chicagoanCommented:
While the my documents redirection scheme implemented this and it would appear the API's must exist, I'm not aware of any tools to make it work for other folders.
Training end users would be one method :-)
There are a bunch of third party products that have this functionality (like http://www.pixel.com.au/products/undelete/undelete_technicaldetails.htm
http://www.amtsoft.com/undelete/
)

Note: You could use an undelete utility on the drive the redirection is pointing to if the file hasn't been overwritten (not too convienient tho)
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ShineOnCommented:
chicagoan - are you kinda-sorta supporting my opinion with fact?  Kewl.  I guess I'm not as crazy as I thought... ;)
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chicagoanCommented:
well... I'm not so sure about read only for the desktop from a functional point of view - in addition it sort of takes the "personal" out of PC - however I do agree that from a records management point of view data should be organized.
Moving "my documents" (and they really aren't YOUR documents, they belong to the enterprise) to a central location where they can be put on fault tolerant systems, backed up, located my management, roam with the user, etc. is not just a good idea, it's a key piece of controlling records. IT managers generally don't have oversight of the vast majority of employees and seem reluctant to lay down the law: "Put your sh*t over here or don't come crying to me". But a memo or chain letter or scrawling a mesage above the urinals couldn't hurt, could it??
yeah - sorta - kinda :)
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ShineOnCommented:
... *redirected* desktop, not "the desktop" ...  And, IMO, if you want the "personal" part of PC, deal with that at home.  The computer given you at work is for work purposes, not so you can play around with personalizing it.

If you aren't willing to "lock down" the desktop and be a "desktop Nazi" so to speak, then you shouldn't even apply redirection to the desktop folder, IMHO.

regardless, the desktop folder should NOT be a repository for documents or key data, whether it's redirected or not.  It should only house what SHOULD be on the desktop.

Documents and key data have their OWN places to go, and should be put in those places.  If those places are redirected folders, cool.  More power to you.  But those constructs are where data and documents BELONG, as opposed to the "desktop" folder.

More opinion, presented in an even more opinionated fashion... :)
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akumanovaAuthor Commented:
People seems unable to provide an answer for my question, but I think my question is not really hard, anyway... My point is, sometimes you may drag and drop something on the desktop but mistakenly presss the delete button to delete them, I personally believe that it occasionally happen to some users, so that's the reason why I attempt to seek a way to solve this problem.  No matter what, thanks for the comment, and I hope I can get a better answer.
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chicagoanCommented:
I think I answered that in the first post.
You have to either use a 3rd party utility to enable that functionality (and two examples of such utilities) or try to undelete on demand with a system ceovery tool.

sorry for all the editorializing but there was a point to it
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ShineOnCommented:
If you make the redirected desktop read-only, nobody can accidentally drag and drop something on the desktop to begin with.  I have worked with people that like to do that on purpose, and it is quite annoying.  The desktop folder isn't intended to hold documents, which is one of the reasons there is a folder called "my documents."  The desktop folder should be considered a system folder which should, in the normal scheme of things, be considered out of bounds.  To me, using the desktop to store documents is as bad as saving all your documents at the root of C: or in the system32 folder.

Like I said, just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
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