SQL Date format

Hi everyone,

Platform: Windows XP Professional + SP1a, Office XP Professional + SP2, SQL Server 2000 + SP3a, Microsoft Excel 2002.

I am experiencing a bit of difficulty with some dates in a query of mine.  I'm using the Microsoft Calendar control as a date picker on the client, and it works just fine.  I'm in Australia, so the date format is spits out is in the format: dd/mm/yyyy.  Unfortunately, the sql server is reading the date as mm/dd/yyyy, which fails for values like 13/01/1979.  Thinking it was a difference in regional settings between the client and the server, I checked and found that they are both set to use English(Australia) as both the system and the user input locales.

I would really appreciate some help with this, I'm sure it's going to be a setting I have overlooked.

Thanks in advance...
Know-WiresAsked:
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Dishan FernandoSoftware Engineer / DBACommented:
SELECT CONVERT( varchar(10),DateColumn,103)
FROM TableName

Replace DateColumn & TableName with ur ones
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FlynniousCommented:
For some reason known only to MS, the SQL Server install uses its own setting for date format, completely separate from the date setting for the machine it's running on.  I believe the format used by SQL is set at install time or similar, and it's quite difficult to change (at least, I've never managed it, but I've never looked that deeply into it).  A better thing to do is write the dates to the database in ISO standard date format (the same format that SQL returns that data in when querying the database).  I appreciate this is quite difficult to arrange for the applications that use SQL, but it's the only reliable way I've found of working with dates in SQL.  ISO standard date reads YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS, although you don't have to specify the time.

So today's date is 2003-11-26

HTH

Flynnious
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HilaireCommented:


set dateformat dmy

insert into mytable(datefield) values('13/01/1979')

Hilaire
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FlynniousCommented:
Cool!  You learn something new every day!

:)
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cerdalCommented:
In SQL Server 6.5 you use the CONVERT function :

CONVERT(DATETIME , MyDateValue , 103)

the online documentation gives the values for the 3rd parameter.

here's a doctored extract, excluding where it deals with time values:

---------------------------------8<------------------------------

1      mm/dd/yy
2      yy.mm.dd
3      dd/mm/yy
4      dd.mm.yy
5      dd-mm-yy
6      dd mon yy
7      mon dd, yy
10      mm-dd-yy
11      yy/mm/dd
12      yymmdd

Add 100 to a style value to get a four-place year that includes the century (yyyy).

---------------------------------8<------------------------------

so style 103 means dd/mm/yyyy

I use Delphi and SQL Server, and I call a function to format Delphi date values for insertion into dynamic SQL scripts:

function MSSQLDate(Dt:TDateTime):String;
begin
  try
    Result := 'CONVERT(datetime,'''+FormatDateTime('yyyy-mm-dd',Dt)+''',102)';
  except
    Result := '';
  end;
end;

You could perhaps do something similar for your string values?
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cerdalCommented:
sorry, rereading my post, I see that my function should have 110 instead of 102 in it. But funny thing is it's worked up to now. Perhaps SQL Server only looks at the digit positioning when reading values in.
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