Do I really have a SCSI drive in my system?

I am trying to add a second hard drive to my system (a Seagate ATA drive) but I have the following problem: I recently upgraded the OS from Win98SE to Win2000. The System Hardware Device Manager reports that my hard drive is a SCSI device. I thought the hard drive that came with this computer was an IDE drive (P/N 0971U, IDE Seagate 7200 RPM, 27 GB). But, as I said, Win2000 reports this as a SCSI drive.

The Seagate installation utility tells me that since there is no ATA drive in my system, I need to make the new ATA drive the boot disk - which means reinstalling the OS and programs!

My questions are: Do I really have an SCSI drive in my system?
If so, how do I add a second hard drive (what kind of drive should I buy?)

Thank you very much!

Rafael Aviles
cationicAsked:
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Glen A.IT Project ManagerCommented:
The Seagate Part 0971U drive is indeed an ATA drive, not SCSI.  Specs for it are available here: http://support.ap.dell.com/docs/storage/0971u/specs.htm
shivsaCommented:
i think u trouble shoot this from BIOS side.
load the latest BIOS for your computer and update it.
shivsaCommented:
R u using Nvida chipset or Via chipset.
These kind of problems are reported with these chip sets.

u need to update the drivers for your motherboard or chipset.
check the drivers for your hard drive/update it too.

check this post. it does not have solution but shows that this may happen.
http://www.techimo.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=71112

This is some kind of  SCSI emulation which windows always uses for IDE drives, it speeds up their performance. so windows treats all drives as scsi, even when their not.

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