• C

array of random integers


How can I create a function to fill an array with random integers between 1 and 100?
alertelAsked:
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Kent OlsenDBACommented:
Hi alertel,

Use the random() function.

The function returns a value from 0 to (the limit that you pass - 1).  Since you want 1 to 100, you should call random(100) and add 1 to the value before you store it into the array location.

Array[position] = random (100) + 1;

Since this is probably homework, you'll have to build all of the other controls yourself.


Good Luck,
Kent
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imstaffCommented:
try:

randomize();
  for(i=0;i<1000;i++) { //suppose that the array have size 1000
    array[i] = rand()%100+1; //0-99 + 1, so it's 1 to 100

Hope this help.
thanks


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efnCommented:
If your library doesn't have random() or randomize() or you otherwise want to confine yourself to standard C library functions, use rand() to generate a random integer and srand() to initialize the pseudo-random number generator.

http://www.acm.uiuc.edu/webmonkeys/book/c_guide/2.13.html#rand

--efn
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junkjunkjunkCommented:
Hi kent,

random function does not take any argument. It simply generates random numbers between 0 and 2^31 - 1.

Alrtel,

Use this....

#define RAND_MAX 99

Array[position] = rand() + 1;

(RAND_MAX is defined in stdlib.h)

JunkJunkJunk
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Kent OlsenDBACommented:

Hi junkjunkjunk,

You're partially correct.   The win32 implementation of random() accepts an integer argument that is the upper limit + 1.  (You want a range of 100 numbers, you pass 100 and the returned value will be from 0 to 99.)

rand() is more general and should be available on all platforms.


Kent
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earth man2Commented:
/* I used this snippet to generate sequence of 109 for a teddy bear name raffle.
Array is used to avoid repeats.
Output is the random sequence */

#include <stdlib.h>

int main( void ) {

int i, count = 0;
int array[110];

  for ( i = 0; i < 109; i++ ) array[i]=0;
  srand( time( NULL ) );
  while ( count < 109 ) {
    i = 1 + (int) (109.0*rand()/(RAND_MAX+1.0));
    if ( i != array[i] ) {
      array[i] = i;
      printf( "%d == %d\n", ++count, i );
    }
  }
  exit(0);
}
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Kent OlsenDBACommented:

Hi earthman2,

If you wan't to create a "list" of integers so that you don't get repeats there's a more efficient way.  It does kind of skew the statistical "norm", but when I'm electronically dealing cards, I certainly want 52 DIFFERENT cards!  :)

#include <stdlib.h>

#define LIMIT 100

int Array[LIMIT];

main ()
{
  int idx, other_idx, save;

  for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)   /*  Initialize every element of the array it its position  (index value)  */
    Array[idx] = idx;

  for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)  /*   Randomly swap element pairs.  Every element will be swapped at least once  */
  {
    other_idx = rand() % LIMIT;
    save = Array[idx];
    Array[idx] = Array[other_idx];
    Array[other_idx] = save;
  }
}

Hmmm.... Looking back, our "solutions" might have been what the original poster was looking for.   :)

Kent
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GingitCommented:
Hello,
I was reading all that you wrote here, and my problem seems similar to me.

i am writing a method which will fill the array of size 7 with random numbers from 1 to 30, but the numbers cannot be zero and cannot repeat within the array.
i have tried so many ways and nothing works.

Please help.

G.
0
GingitCommented:
This is my code, maybe someone can find a mistake there (it allows duplicate values in array)

int []GetLotteryNumbers()
{
                                    
int[]lotteryNums=new int[7];
                  
bool isDup = false;
                  
for (int i=0;i<=6;i++)
{
      int randomNumber=RandomInt(31);
                        
      if (randomNumber!=0)
      {
      lotteryNums[i]=randomNumber;

      foreach (int num in lotteryNums)
            {
            if (num == randomNumber)
            {
                  isDup = true;
                  break;
                                          
            }
            if (!isDup)
            {
            lotteryNums[i]=randomNumber;
            }
            }
                              
              }
                        
     }
   return lotteryNums;
}
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ozoCommented:
for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)  /*   Randomly swap element pairs.  Every element will be swapped at least once  */
  {
    other_idx = rand() % LIMIT;
    save = Array[idx];
    Array[idx] = Array[other_idx];
    Array[other_idx] = save;
  }
}
This produces a biased distribution
Instead, use
other_idx =  rand() % (idx+1);
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Kent OlsenDBACommented:
Hi ozo,

As long as rand() is evenly distributed, the original "swap pairs" logic is sound.  Every element is assured of being the "source" in a swap at least once, and will statistically be the "destination" once.  The number of times each element is the destination can vary -- randomness allows each element to be the destination any number of times, including zero.

The suggestion to use (idx+1) instead of (LIMIT) doesn't improve the distribution.

#define LIMIT = 100
#define ITERATIONS = 10000

long Count[LIMIT] = {0};
int   Array[LIMIT];

for (iter = 0; iter < ITERATIONS; iter++)
{
  for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)  /*  Initialize the array to 1,2,3,4...LIMIT */
    Array[idx] = idx;

  for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)  /*   Randomly swap element pairs.  Every element will be swapped at least once  */
  {
    other_idx = rand() % LIMIT;
    save = Array[idx];
    Array[idx] = Array[other_idx];
    Array[other_idx] = save;
  }
  for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)  /*  Count the value by position  */
    Count[idx] += (long)Array[idx];
}

for (idx = 0; idx < LIMIT; idx++)   /*  Display the distribution  */
  printf (" %3d  %8.4f\n", (float)Array[idx]/(float)LIMIT);


Kent
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ozoCommented:
consider LIMIT = 3
rand % LIMIT 3 times gives 27 equally likely posibilities
But there are 6 possible permutations of 3 elements
therefore some of the 6 premutations will be generated more often than others
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Kent OlsenDBACommented:

Hi ozo,

After thinking about this for a few minutes, I came to the conclusion that number of swaps shouldn't matter -- as long as the chances of any one swap occuring is equal to the chance of any other swap.

Then I set about proving it, and was surprised to see that you are in fact, correct.  The distribution of occurences skews so that 3 outcomes occur 4/27ths of the time and the other 3 occur 5/27ths.  Changing the one line as you suggested results in all 6 occurring 1/6th of the time +-.01%.


Excuse me.  I have to go do the math......
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