?
Solved

tar - flatten on extract?

Posted on 2003-11-30
7
Medium Priority
?
2,824 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Call me an old fool, but i can't seem to see an option for flattening the path on extract. i.e. to ignore the directory structure and just to put the file into the current directory. Can anyone enlighten me? I'm using

tar (GNU tar) 1.13.19
0
Comment
Question by:CEHJ
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
7 Comments
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
ID: 9846423
which os u are using.

on OSF or digiatl Unix there is option
-P.

check guntar for this option.
0
 
LVL 86

Author Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 9846686
Using Linux. This is what it says about -P (not sure if i know what they mean)

  -P, --absolute-names         don't strip leading `/'s from file names
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
mbekker earned 500 total points
ID: 9848896
Hi CEHJ,

As far as I can see there is no option to flatten the path. (GNU tar 1.13.25)

You could try the following script:

tarfile=$1
shift
tar -tvf $tarfile | grep -v "^d" | awk {'print $6'} | while read filename
do
  tar "$@" -O -xf Desktop.tar $filename >${filename##*/}
done

The first parameter for this script would be the tar-archive, all other parameters will be given to the second tar command, which extracts the files.

Good luck!
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mbekker
ID: 9848901
Bummer, got a typo in my script! ;-)

The "Desktop.tar" part must be: $tarfile
0
 
LVL 86

Author Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 9849314
Hmm. Thanks. I can give that a try. I'm not sure what character ^d is and you lose me after that (don't know awk really, etc.) ;-)
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mbekker
ID: 9850338
The ^ in grep -v "^d"  means the beginning of a line. The first character in the line may not (-v) be a 'd'.

When listing a tar archive, the directories are also listed. They don't have to be extracted, so with a grep -v "^d" they will be excluded.

The 'awk' part will only print the sixth field every line, where the filename is stored. For every file the next tar command will be runned:

  tar "$@" -O -xf $tarfile $filename >${filename##*/}

where

 "$@"  all other arguments given to script will be passed here to tar command
 -O     write file to stdout
 -x      extract archive
 -f $tarfile   tar archive to extract
 $filename  complete path+file to extract
 >${filename##*/}  redirect output to filename without path
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:Karl Heinz Kremer
ID: 9909254
How bad do you want this? If you are fluent in Perl, you can use the Archive:Tar package (http://www.perl.com/CPAN-local/modules/by-module/Archive/) to extract the files yourself and write them out in one directory. It's a bit more work, but if you have to do this not just once, it may be worth the time.
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Attention: This article will no longer be maintained. If you have any questions, please feel free to mail me. jgh@FreeBSD.org Please see http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/ for the updated article. It is avail…
When you do backups in the Solaris Operating System, the file system must be inactive. Otherwise, the output may be inconsistent. A file system is inactive when it's unmounted or it's write-locked by the operating system. Although the fssnap utility…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Suggested Courses

719 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question