Solved

Making your own linux boot disk !

Posted on 2003-11-30
5
584 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Hi everybody ! How can i make the most simple boot disk just to able to boot the computer ? What i want is to be able to have the equivalent of a dos boot disk ? I know there is a lot of info out there but it's to fragmented  for me .So if someone can tell me all the steps in a clearer manner i will be more than happy

Thank U all
Toxixtones
0
Comment
Question by:toxix
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:Karl Heinz Kremer
ID: 9847066
You need two things for a Linux bootdisk that does not just boot your Linux installation on a hard disk: The Linux kernel, and a root file system. If you want to do anything with this disk, you need some programs on the root file system. Because the Linux kernel is not that small anymore, it's very unlikely that you can create one from scratch (without a lot of experience) that can do anything.

If you just want to boot the Linux installation on your hard disk, you can write the kernel image to a floppy disk. If e.g. your kernel is /boot/vmlinuz run the following command:
dd if=/boot/vmlinuz of=/dev/fd0

If you really want to learn how to create a (useful) boot disk, you should take a look at some of the floppy disk Linux systems (or small Linux systems in general). Here are some links:

http://bengross.com/smallunix.html
http://www.icewalkers.com/Linux/Software/512350/RIP.html
http://www.linuxlinks.com/Distributions/Floppy/

I've done this myself a number of years ago (http://www.khk.net/lods/). It's fun, and you learn a lot about how things need to be packaged.

Have fun.
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:paullamhkg
ID: 9847343
or try to get one from www.bootdisk.com

also have a look here http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/Linux/Q_20809768.html, someone have similar question as yours :-)
0
 

Author Comment

by:toxix
ID: 9863470
Hi guys thanks for the info ! i need to specify something.The goal of my question is i want to learn how to make a floppy that will be able to log to an ftp server and then from there start an installation of let say Redhat... I really want to know all the mecanics under the hood !

thanks again guys

Toxix
0
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Duncan Roe
ID: 10068514
Usually you set up a Kickstart server and boot clients off eth0. No floppy needed.
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
paullamhkg earned 150 total points
ID: 10153136
Three disks are needed for Intel based computers: "boot.img" or "bootnet.img", "supp.img", and "modules.img". Choose "boot.img" for local installs (CD-Rom, hard drive) or "bootnet.img" for network installs (NFS, FTP, HTTP). Copy the three images to 1.44 MB floopy disks using: dd if=file.img of=/dev/fd0 bs=72k under Linux or "rawrite.exe" under DOS or Windows.
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Linux Hosting 16 102
What is the best way to transfer files from and to Linux VNC window? 9 88
Centos 7 DNS server not replying to clients 3 90
Windows 10 linux VM 30 90
Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how we can use conditional statements using Python.
Connecting to an Amazon Linux EC2 Instance from Windows Using PuTTY.
How to Install VMware Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 (RHEL 6.4) Step-by-Step Tutorial

738 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question