Problem with enum delcaration moving from VC++6.0 -> VC++. .Net

I have to move an old C++ project up to VS.net from 6.0.

i have a declration:

typedef enum
{
     DEBUG =0,
     BLAH,
     BLAH
} MyEnum;

which under .Net gives me
     " syntax error : missing '}' before '='"    
on the DEBUG line

Now i assume that since "DEBUG" is not in its own namespace and im doing a debug build that there are issues with DEBUG already defined. (and the problem goes away under a release build).
My question then is how is it that this simple problem doesnt occur when using 6.0 and then how can i get it to compile under .net?


Thanks.



tamarindAsked:
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DexstarCommented:
@tamarind:

> Now i assume that since "DEBUG" is not in its own namespace and im doing a
> debug build that there are issues with DEBUG already defined. (and the problem
> goes away under a release build). My question then is how is it that this
> simple problem doesnt occur when using 6.0 and then how can i get it to compile
> under .net?

The issue is that "DEBUG" has been #defined to something.  It seems it is defined differently under the two compilers, which is why it breaks on you.  I think that under .NET, DEBUG is not defined as particular value, so all the references get removed, so your line becomes:
     =0,

Which is what the compiler was complaining about.  Under VC6, it might have been defined as some other value, that would make it work, for whatever reason.  It might not have been defined at all (sometimes _DEBUG is used).

Using keywords as your own value names is not a good idea.  DEBUG is not a true keyword, but it does have special meaning under at least some compilers.  My suggestion is that you change DEBUG in your source to some other name (Visual Studio has a nice search/replace that will span multiple files), and try pick names that don't overlap.

Hope That Helps,
Dex*
0

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DexstarCommented:
@tamarind:

> i have a declration:

Sometimes in my enumerated types, I will use the name of the type as a prefix to the individual values.  That way, I can tell at a glance that the value is part of that enum type.  It also helps to eliminate name collisions (Both of which are nice when you have projects with many enum types).

Applying this system to your type, it would look like this:
     typedef enum
     {
          MyEnum_DEBUG = 0,
          MyEnum_BLAH,
          // Other values go here
     } MyEnum;

Dex*
0
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