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ISO stands for ..?

Posted on 2003-11-30
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I know that ISO usually stands for International Standards Organization, with over 100 nations blah, blah, blah.  What does it mean within the context of Linux install CDs?  In other words, for every site that I visit about Linux installation there are these instructions for getting the ISO images, then burning them to CDs, etc.  Who decided to use this acronym and why?
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Question by:dbyrne03
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AlbertaBeef earned 200 total points
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ISO is not an acronym - The name derives from the Greek word iso, which means equal. An ISO File is a CD-ROM Disk Image File ready to be written to CD. Quoting Microsoft, "An ISO image file is a snapshot of the data and layout of a CD-ROM, saved in ISO-9660 Format." When the .ISO Image File is burned to CD, it becomes a duplicate of the original CD and the contents can then be read on a PC. Whereas if the .ISO Image File is Burned to CD as a File, that .ISO Image File remains a File. Why an ISO Image File? Best way to transport contents of a CD from a HD. Ever Download a CD? Per say, No. Ever Download an ISO Image File? Certainly! Get it?

Quoting Nero, "Nero supports burning of UDF and UDF Bridge CDs containing a UDF and an ISO9660 File System. Windows 98, and Windows 2000 can write the UDF File System without any special driver. Windows 98 and Windows 2000 will read the UDF File System, if both UDF and ISO File Systems are found on the media. Burning in UDF file format will be especially useful in the future, if DVDs are to be written, because UDF is the best File System to be written onto a DVD."

An ISO 9660 File System is a standard CD-ROM File System allows Users to read the same CD-ROM whether you're on a PC, Mac, or other major computer platform. The standard, issued in 1988, was written by an industry group named High Sierra. Almost all computers with CD-ROM drives can read files from an ISO 9660 File System. High Sierra and ISO 9660 are identical in content, but the exact format is different.

In most cases, an ISO Image File when written to CD will then become a Bootable CD, ready for installation of it's contents. Do not burn an ISO Image File to CD as a Data File or it will not run the software on the CD!
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by:paullamhkg
ID: 9848583
AlbertaBeef gave you the answer already.
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