finding and manipulating multiple occurences in same line

Hello:

I have an XML file and do not want to use XML::DOM.
The data I need is in one line like this:
...<DAT>123A</DAT>..otherstuff ...<DAT>123B</DAT>......<DAT>123C</DAT>....

I neet to pull the content of <DAT>..</DAT> possibly to an arry.
So the arry would have 123A, 123B, 123C.
How do I do that using regex without doing splits and so on.  Thanks
Yours Truely.

basiloAsked:
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FishMongerCommented:
There are several ways to pull out the info; here's one method.

$str = '...<DAT>123A</DAT>..otherstuff ...<DAT>123B</DAT>......<DAT>123C</DAT>...';

(@dat) = $str =~ /<DAT>([^<]+)<\/DAT>/g;
print "$_\n" foreach @dat;

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FishMongerCommented:
Since you're going to be reading in an xml file, you'd use something closer to this:

open XML, "xml filename" or die "couldn't open xml file $!";

while (<XML>) {
   while (/<DAT>([^<]+)<\/DAT>/g) {
      push @dat, $1;
   }
}
print "$_\n" foreach @dat;
FishMongerCommented:
If the info you want is broken up into seperate lines like this:

...<DAT>123A</DAT>..otherstuff ...<DAT>123B
</DAT>......<DAT>123C</DAT>...'
...<DAT>234A
</DAT>..otherstuff ...<DAT>234B</DAT>......<DAT>234C</DAT>...'
...<DAT>345A</DAT>..otherstuff ...<DAT>345B</DAT>......<DAT>
345C</DAT>...'

You can do something like this:

open XML, "xml filename" or die "couldn't open xml file $!";
{
   local $/;
   $dat = <XML>;
}
@dat = $dat =~ /<DAT>([^<]+)<\/DAT>/gs;
foreach (@dat) {s/\n//g}
print Dumper @dat;
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basiloAuthor Commented:
This is good.    I'm trying to understand the logic behined ([^<]+) and how it is pushed onto @dat.  Thank you.
FishMongerCommented:
[^<]
Is a negated character class that says to match any character that is not a <
The + tells it to repeat the match as mush as possible.
The (  ) surrounding it, captures the match into $1 var.
FishMongerCommented:
I forgot to add;

Since this is a direct assignment, $1 is assigned to the first element of the @dat array.
The g at the end of the regex tells it find all matches and since it's in list context, each match is assigned to the next element of the array.
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