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Amanda Backup Server Specs

I'm currently building an Amanda server to backup 16 hosts (the OS's:
Win2k, FBSD 5.0, OBSD 2.9-3.5, RH 8.0) which amounts to approximately
180gb of data. For backup medium, my current plan is to use 3 Dell
110T 40/80gb dlt tape drives. This is my first experience with Amanda,
and would like some input on how powerful the server should be to
handle the aformentioned workload.

After a considerable amount of research (google, Unix Backup and
Recovery, amanda.org, the amanda-users group :), etc), I've been
unable to find documentation on what kind of processor power is
necessary. I do intend to use software compression rather than
hardware compression, so I don't want to skimp on the processor.

Any input or personal experience would be greatly appreciated (links,
rtfm page x!, books)!

Thanks for the help
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yakuza_soozo
Asked:
yakuza_soozo
1 Solution
 
chicagoanCommented:
> I do intend to use software compression rather than hardware compression
Why? The hardware compression will stream the drives as fast as you can feed it and will recoverable on any DLT.

I've fed 5 DLT's (3 7000's and 2 8000's) with a dual pentium pro 200 and dual 100BaseT NIC's on fast ether channel, it doesn't take too much.
If you're using GIGe the nic could eat some cpu clicks, but I'd thing anything in the 2Ghz class ought to be fine.
Fast disk helps the catalogue get written.
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yakuza_soozoAuthor Commented:
>> I do intend to use software compression rather than hardware compression
>Why? The hardware compression will stream the drives as fast as you can feed it and will recoverable on any DLT.

By going the software compression route, AMANDA would be able to track usage and make better estimates of image sizes. I realize that the aforementioned features aren't absolutely necessary, but since this is my first experience dealing with backup systems, I figured that additional information on data/image sizes would prove to be quite valuable. If further down the road I decide that hardware compression is the way to go, a machine with a fast proc would have no problems handling it.
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