What is the number sign (#) after a number?

I see a lot of 10#, 0#, etc., in VB code.  For example, Log(10#).  What does the postfixed "#" sign mean?
NiemandAsked:
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DabasCommented:
Niemand,
When you write 10# you are forcing VB to store the number as a double.
I assume that 10 by itself will be stored as an integer (2 bytes)

If you do any calculations such as 10/5, the compiler will run a different routine than if you have 10#/5

Dabas
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DabasCommented:
Hi Niemand,
From VB Help:

Double Data Type
     

Double (double-precision floating-point) variables are stored as IEEE 64-bit (8-byte) floating-point numbers ranging in value from -1.79769313486231E308 to -4.94065645841247E-324 for negative values and from 4.94065645841247E-324 to 1.79769313486232E308 for positive values. The type-declaration character for Double is the number sign (#).



Dabas
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NiemandAuthor Commented:
Dabas,

I've read that under VB Help.  It doesn't seem relevant.  I'm not declaring any variables.  The number sign "#" comes right after a number.  In Log(10#), the number "10" is not a variable, is it?  In a line like:

Item = 0#

The number "0" is not a variable.
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Mike TomlinsonMiddle School Assistant TeacherCommented:
You mostly see declarations like that where Option Explicit is not being used.  As Dabas has pointed out, the value or variable will be implicitly declared depending upon the character postfixed to it.

Idle_Mind
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