?
Solved

installing a new HDD

Posted on 2003-12-02
9
Medium Priority
?
243 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21
i have installed a new HDD on my linux redhat 9 machine.. but it has detected it as a new hardware on reboot. plus what do i need to do to make it available to the system

mount it rite.. well i need help.. Thanks in advance
and do i need to format it or something like for file system .. etc.. like we do in windows
0
Comment
Question by:lomaree
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
9 Comments
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:lomaree
ID: 9864452
or maybe if i do fdisk /dev/hdb and then partition it rite.. rite
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 9864542
To add a disk to an existing system you need to first use fdisk to set up one or more partitions. Then it's necessary to use mke2fs to make a file system on the new partition(s). Once those tasks have been completed you can modify /etc/fstab to mount the new file system at boot.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:lomaree
ID: 9864778
yeah i got that one correct , i have also formatted the newly partitioned hdd using

mkfs -t ext2 -j /dev/hdb1

but now i can't seems to mount the file system . what do i do .
0
WordPress Tutorial 1: Installation & Setup

WordPress is a very popular option for running your web site and can be used to get your content online quickly for the world to see. This guide will walk you through installing the WordPress server software and the initial setup process.

 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 200 total points
ID: 9866753
If you have a valid file system on the partition you need a mount point for it (e.q., 'mkdir /new-disk') and you should then be able to mount it with 'mount /dev/hdb1 /new-disk'. To have it mounted at boot an entry in /etc/fstab is needed, something like:

/dev/hdb1                /new-disk           ext3    defaults        1 2
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:pjedmond
ID: 9878496
mkdir /mnt/drive2
mount -t ext2 /dev/hdb1 /mnt/drive2

Should do the trick:)...obviously as root!
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 10179671
I believe I provided the answer to this question.
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:Karl Heinz Kremer
ID: 10328447
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:
Answered by jlevie
Please leave any comments here within the next four days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

khkremer
EE Cleanup Volunteer
0

Featured Post

On Demand Webinar: Networking for the Cloud Era

Did you know SD-WANs can improve network connectivity? Check out this webinar to learn how an SD-WAN simplified, one-click tool can help you migrate and manage data in the cloud.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
Fine Tune your automatic Updates for Ubuntu / Debian
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month14 days, 5 hours left to enroll

800 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question