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Why so many different Database recordsets?

Posted on 2003-12-04
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Last Modified: 2010-04-02
I start having some projects that need to connect to databases, mostly Access. I'm using Visual Studio C++ V6. The problem is that I see so many standards such as ADO, DAO, ODBC, OLE DB, and so on..

I don't know which one is the best way to go. I'm getting lost. Please anybody can tell me some links that have a better explanation on these different recordsets, with their advantages and disadvantages?
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Question by:Volga
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JensUniweb earned 50 total points
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OLE DB is the base for at least ADO. ADO is just a simpler form of OLE DB. DAO I'm not sure about. I would suggest ADO or OLE DB for the future.
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