....\Tables.cpp(1615) : error C2065: 'gIdle' : undeclared identifier

Hi,
When trying to make a build from C++ source code I get the following message:
Compiling resources...
Compiling...
blah...
.
.
.
blah...
....\Tables.cpp(1615) : error C2065: 'gIdle' : undeclared identifier

'gIdle' IS declared somewhere in the beginning of Tables.cpp. Besides, this is strange because I got a large chunk of code which is SUPPOSED to pass compilation without any problem.

Short project history: What happened is I got the source code and got access to large databases that interface header files can be found in. But the project files RGui.dsp and RGui.dsw were missing information, so I had to build the links myself pointing to the paths where the needed header files are located. When now building, it no longer tells me files are missing, but rather gives me the above **undeclared identifier** message.

Any help will be much appreciated,
Giora
gimozesAsked:
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DanRollinsCommented:
>> 'gIdle' IS declared somewhere in the beginning of Tables.cpp

The fact that you say "somewhere" indicates that you are not sure where.  You will need to track down the declaration and be 100% certain that it is declared.  I'll wager that it is declared in a .h file that is not #included at the top of Tables.cpp

That coulkd happen in the case you describe.  The original project dsw could have specified a particular INCLUDE path and your default INCLUDE path is bringing in a different version of the .H that provides the declaration.  Use the IDE's 'Search in Files' to locate all references to that variable.  That usually shakes loose problems like these.

Another thing that can happen:  
It is possible for the precompiled header to get out of date in a few strange circumstances.  But that is eacy to fix:  Do a Clean before the Bild.  I assume you've done that, but It's worth mentioning.

One other common problem:  You may have mispelled it!
    gIdle looks a lot like
    gldle which looks a lot like
    gldIe and so forth.

-- Dan
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migoEXCommented:
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