Simple Domain Constraints

Hello,

Suppose I have simplified,

Items_details(item_id, color)

What is the best method to enforce color is valid.

1. Check constraint
2. Trigger
3. Seperate table containing a single column 'color'

Are seperate single column tables used, suppose you want to record configuration settings for your web site, containing 50+ parameters.

Thanks.
robert_83Asked:
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robert_83Author Commented:
"suppose you want to record configuration settings for your web site, containing 50+ parameters." <- I meant tables with no relationship.
andrewstCommented:
Well, the most efficient way would be the check constraint.  But if you want users to be able to specify new colours later through the application, then it may be preferable to have a table of colours and a foreign key from the item_details table to the colours table.

I would never use a trigger to enforce such validation - that would be inefficient.
robert_83Author Commented:
The table for color would essentially be single columned or at most have another column for id, I suppose this is ok, as it provides an efficent method to check values.

The check constraint I assume would be where color in 'x', ... 'y'

The trigger I also believed would the most inefficent because it checks all rows, after every update / insert on color?

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andrewstCommented:
Yes, a single-columned table is OK, and the check constraint would be as you say.

A FOR EACH ROW trigger does not check all rows, only the rows being inserted or updated.  It is less efficient simply because it is procedural PL/SQL code that is run for each record, rather than a declarative constraint which can be performed more optimally.  Only use triggers for validation or action that cannot be performed via a check, foreign key or unique constraint.
robert_83Author Commented:
Cheers,

If the only colors availible were say between 4 - 10. Would you prefer a single row table, or check (). I personally believe the table is better, though only if colors are likely to be updated in the future.
andrewstCommented:
I imagine colours are highly likely to be added in the future, so would probably go for the table.  But here we are getting into business-specific decisions rather than technical ones.  But I would only use a check constraint for domains that I didn't expect to change over time.

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