Number of bytes allocated for char arrays by subl %esp seems much too high (in linux 2.4, gcc 3.2.2)

Hi!

I noticed that when I declare a buffer of, for example, char[5], the assembly code generated by gcc actually allocates a much larger buffer, in this case 24 bytes:

subl $24, (%esp)

How can this be explained?
dn6Asked:
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grg99Commented:
If you mean at function entry, the compiler might allocate some extra space to store temporary results, or to store registers, or to align the stack pointer, or to set up some kind of exception stack frame, or to pre-allocate some space needed in any variables declared in interior code blocks.  
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
for static or constant char buffer, commonly the compiler may allocate same-size memory, or a bit more for memory alignment. for char buffer of a function, depends on its type, usage and how compiler push them into stack. for dynamic allocated char buffer, it needs extra memory for MCB, memory control block, it describes the size, type and other attributes of a memory block.

hope it helps,
bbao
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mtmikeCommented:
GCC aligns the stack pointer to a multiple of 16 bytes by default. You can change its behaviour using the -mpreferred-stack-boundary switch. For example, 'gcc -mpreferred-stack-boundary=2' forces gcc to align the stack pointer to a multiple of 2^2=4 bytes. Optimizing for size (-Os) has the same effect.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
yes, it depends on type, processor, operating system and even compiler.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
dn6, any feedback please?
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