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Modem shairing options???

Posted on 2003-12-06
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I have two P4 PCs (one running XP HM and other XP pro) connected
through a switch on ethernet. One is mine and other belongs to my 13 year
old son. Both the systems have their own dial-up modems but we share the
same phone line.  Majority of the times there is no problem with telephone
line sharing but sometimes he has to abort so that I can go online or vice-versa.
 
Is it possible to share a modem at "will" i.e. only when it is already being used?
The thing is,  majority of the time, other PC will be off and so making one of the
modem primary is not a good option.
 
Pl. advise.

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Question by:pan_kaj
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 9890657
Have you thought about this

Description of Internet Connection Sharing
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;234815

BEGIN ARTICLE

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition

This article was previously published under Q234815

SUMMARY
This article describes Internet Connection Sharing (ICS). Note that this article is for informational use only, and because of this, it may not contain troubleshooting information.

For problem-solving information related to ICS, try searching again with the following query words and keywords:
internet and connection and sharing
dun and modem and isp (if one or more of these words relates to your issue or question)
To more effectively search the Microsoft Knowledge Base, use keywords that relate to your issue when you search. For additional information about how to more effectively search by using keywords, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

242450 How to Query the Microsoft Knowledge Base Using Keywords


MORE INFORMATION
ICS provides networked computers with the ability to share a single connection to the Internet.

If you have multiple computers, you can use ICS to allow you and others on your local area network (LAN) to perform different tasks simultaneously. For example, one person can send and receive e-mail messages, while another person downloads a file, and another person browses the Internet. You can also gain access to your corporate e-mail accounts from a client computer while others on your LAN cannot. You can use Web-enabled programs (such as downloading updates) as well as Microsoft NetMeeting and other video conferencing programs.
Internet Connection Sharing Capabilities
Multiple users can gain access to the Internet through a single connection by using Dial-Up Networking and local networking.
Connected devices receive transparent network configuration by using Domain Name System (DNS) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to resolve Internet names.
Any IP-attached device can connect, including older Windows-based clients, non-Windows-based clients, Microsoft Windows 98-based clients, and Microsoft Windows 2000-based clients, with no additional client software required.
Connected devices and software have comprehensive protocol support. For example, you can play Internet games without additional configuration, or you can use Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Virtual Private Networking (VPN) to gain access to your corporate network.
Windows Support for Connection Sharing
To connect multiple computers to the Internet through a single Internet connection, one computer must be running Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows 2000, or Windows Millennium Edition (Me) with Internet Connection Sharing installed. Other computers on your LAN can then gain access to the Internet through the connection on the computer with Internet Connection Sharing.

NOTE: ICS is a built-in feature of Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows 2000, and Windows Me, and is not a component available for download.
Internet Connection Sharing Components
DHCP Allocator - A simplified DHCP service that assigns the IP address, gateway, and name server on the local network.
DNS Proxy - Resolves names on behalf of local network clients and forwards queries.
Network Address Translation (NAT) - Maps a set of private addresses to a set of public addresses. NAT tracks private-source IP addresses and public-destination IP addresses for outbound flows. It changes the IP address information and edits the required IP header information dynamically.
Auto-dial - Automatically dials connections.
Application programming interfaces (APIs) - For configuration, status, and dial control for programs.

Setting Up a Network with Internet Connect Sharing
Your ICS network is a type of local area network that relies on a single computer called a gateway, through which all other computers and TCP/IP-capable devices connect to the Internet.

The hardware and software needed to set up a home network includes:
A primary computer, called a gateway, that provides network connectivity to the Internet. This computer must be running Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows 2000, or Windows Me with Internet Connection Sharing enabled.
One or more computers running Windows 95, Windows 98, Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, or other TCP-IP enabled client software.
Devices that are capable of connecting to the Internet.
A network connection device for each computer.
Cabling and hubs, depending on the type of connection devices you use.
A single modem (or an ISDN or ADSL line) for the entire network.
Internet browser software and TCP/IP drivers installed on each device that shares the connection.
You can enable Internet Connection Sharing by using the Add/Remove Programs tool in Windows 98 Second Edition or Windows Me:
Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs.
On the Windows Setup tab, double-click Internet Tools.
Click to select the Internet Connection Sharing check box, and then click OK.
Click OK, and then follow the instructions on the screen to run the Internet Connection Sharing wizard.
For additional information about ICS, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

234863 Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition Icsrm.txt File Contents

For additional information about troubleshooting ICS issues, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

238135 How to Troubleshoot Internet Connection Sharing Problems

For additional information about troubleshooting automatic dialing issues with ICS, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

236445 ICS Does Not Automatically Dial an Internet Connection

For additional information about disabling ICS, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

230112 How to Disable Internet Connection Sharing

For additional information about problems with your computer restarting before the Internet Connection Sharing Wizard finishes, or for information about uninstalling and reinstalling ICS, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

227172 Your Computer Restarts Before ICS Wizard Is Set Up Completely

For additional information about problems setting up ICS, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

229829 Internet Connection Sharing Is Not Set Up Correctly

For additional information about ICS and TCP/IP requirements, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

230070 TCP/IP Must Be Bound to All Adapters Connecting ICS Host to LAN

Last Reviewed: 10/10/2002
Keywords: kbFAQ kbinfo KB234815

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 9890660
If you go to that link it has a few vidoes that walk you through the steps.
HOW TO: Configure Internet Connection Sharing in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q306126&sd=tech

BEGIN ARTICLE

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows XP Professional
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

This article was previously published under Q306126
IN THIS TASK
SUMMARY

How to Use Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)

On the Host Computer
On the Client Computer
Troubleshooting
REFERENCES
SUMMARY
This article describes how to set up and use the Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) feature in Microsoft Windows XP. With ICS, you can use networked computers to share a single connection to the Internet.

How to Use Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)
To use ICS to share your Internet connection, the host computer must have one network adapter configured to connect to the internal network, and one network adapter or modem configured to connect to the Internet.

On the Host Computer
On the host computer, share the Internet connection:
Log on to the host computer as Administrator or Owner.
On the taskbar, click Start, and then click Control Panel.
In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections under Pick a category.
Under the section, or pick a Control Panel icon, click Network Connections.
Right-click the connection that you use to connect to the Internet. For example, if you connect to the Internet using a modem, right-click the connection that you want under Dial-up.
On the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties.
Click the Advanced tab.
Under Internet Connection Sharing, click the Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection check box.
If you are sharing a dial-up Internet connection, click to select the Establish a dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet check box if you want to allow your computer to automatically connect to the Internet.
Click OK. The following message appears:
When Internet Connection Sharing is enabled, your LAN adapter will be set to use IP
address 192.168.0.1. Your computer may lose connectivity with other computers on
your network. If these other computers have static IP addresses, you should set them
to obtain their IP addresses automatically. Are you sure you want to enable Internet
Connection Sharing?

Click Yes.
The connection to the Internet is shared to other computers on the local area network (LAN). The network adapter that is connected to the LAN is configured with a static IP address of 192.168.0.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0
To view a video of how to configure the host computer for Internet Connection Sharing, click the Play button () on the Windows Media Player viewer below:

If you have problems viewing this video, click here.  

NOTE: To view the above video, Windows Media Player 7.0 or later must be installed on your computer. For additional information about how to obtain Windows Media Player version 7.1, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
299321 Description and Availability of Windows Media Player 7.1

back to the top
On the Client Computer
To connect to the Internet using the shared connection you must first confirm the LAN Adapter IP Configuration then configure the client computer:

To Confirm the LAN Adapter IP Configuration:
Log on to the client computer as Administrator or Owner.
On the taskbar, click Start, and then click Control Panel.
In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections under Pick a category.
Under the section, or pick a Control Panel icon, click Network Connections.
Right-click Local Area Connection and then on the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties.
On the General tab, in the This connection uses the following items list, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.
In the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, click Obtain an IP address automatically (if it is not already selected), and then click OK.

NOTE: You can also assign a unique static IP address in the range of 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254. For example, you can assign the following static IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway:
   IP Address      192.168.0.2
   Subnet mask     255.255.255.0
   Default gateway 192.168.0.1
                              
In the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box, click OK.
Quit Control Panel.
To view a video of how to confirm the LAN adapter IP configuration, click the Play button () on the Windows Media Player viewer below:

If you have problems viewing this video, click here.  

NOTE: To view the above video, Windows Media Player 7.0 or later must be installed on your computer. For additional information about how to obtain Windows Media Player version 7.1, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
299321 Description and Availability of Windows Media Player 7.1

To configure the client computer to use the shared Internet connection:

On the taskbar, click Start, and then click Control Panel.
In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections under Pick a category.
Under the section, or pick a Control Panel icon, click Internet Options.
In the Internet Properties dialog box, click the Connections tab.
Click the Setup button.

The New Connection Wizard starts.
On the Welcome to the New Connection Wizard page, click Next.
Click Connect to the Internet, and then click Next.
Click Set up my connection manually, and then click Next.
Click Connect using a broadband connection that is always on, and then click Next.
On the Completing the New Connection Wizard page, click Finish.
Quit Control Panel.
When you now start Internet Explorer, the client computer will attempt to connect to the Internet using the host computer's shared Internet connection.
To view a video of how to configure the client computer to use the shared Internet connection, click the Play button () on the Windows Media Player viewer below:

If you have problems viewing this video, click here.  

NOTE: To view the above video, Windows Media Player 7.0 or later must be installed on your computer. For additional information about how to obtain Windows Media Player version 7.1, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
299321 Description and Availability of Windows Media Player 7.1

Troubleshooting
When you enable Internet Connection Sharing on the host computer, the host computer's LAN adapter is automatically assigned the IP address of 192.168.0.1. Because of this, one of the following situations may occur:
IP Address Conflict
Each computer on the LAN must have a unique IP address. If more than one computer is assigned the same IP address, an IP conflict occurs and one of the network adapters is disabled until the conflict is resolved. To resolve this conflict, configure the client computer to automatically obtain an IP address, or assign it a unique IP address.
Loss of network connectivity
If your network is configured with a different IP address range than is used by ICS, you will lose network connectivity with the host computer. To resolve this issue, configure the client computers to automatically obtain an IP address, or assign each client computer a unique IP address in the range of 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254.

REFERENCES

Last Reviewed: 2/26/2003
Keywords: kbArtTypeSHOWME kberrmsg kbHOWTOmaster kbtshoot KB306126 kbAudITPro

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE  
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Author Comment

by:pan_kaj
ID: 9890691
Thanks Crazyone for ur prompt reply.

I did go to the document u refered.  Unfortunately, it talks about setting a default
modem for shairing in a network.

In my case, I want to share the modem only if it is already connected to internet.
If not (if the other PC is off which is very common), I would like to use my modem
only to access internet.

I am not sure whether it is possible also?  
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Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 9890710
That sort of is what ICS does. If you are connected to the internet and we will call your machine the host machine then the other machine we will call if the client machine will not need to dial out it will share the connection already established.

Are the machines connected together as a network through the network cards?
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Expert Comment

by:chicagoan
ID: 9891936
Unless you want to use Internet Connection Sharing, the only practical way to do what you want is to build or buy a router

 
Many broadband routers have dial backup
http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?sec=Products&pg=Product-Details&prod=67&site=c
Wchich can be use the (external) modem as your primary connection

Or setup a linux box as a firewall/router with diald to do on-demand dialing.
There used to be a MINI linux demand dialer that fit on a floppy but it's been some time since I saw an active link for it, you might try the newsgroups - I suspect a really old kernel might have some nasty vulnerabilities so I think I'd go for a recent distro.
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Author Comment

by:pan_kaj
ID: 9891969
Hello CrazyOne

The machines are connected through network cards using a switch (wired ethernet
LAN).

My worry is that the system which i am dreaming should allow dynamic Host & Client relationship.
What I mean is that sometimes if has logon earlier to me than he should be host and I should be client
and vice-versa.

Your answer probably means that it is do able even on dial-up access modems and that is encourging.

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Author Comment

by:pan_kaj
ID: 9891976
Hello chicagoan,

thanks for ur message.  I am using only Win XP and have no experience with Linux.
I want to avoid spending extra for a router (since dialup connections are sufficient
for our needs).
Does the MINI linux dailer which have talked is compataible with XP?
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chicagoan earned 125 total points
ID: 9892103
>Does the MINI linux dailer which have talked is compataible with XP?
If you have an old machine that you want to use as a router/firewall, it would be transparent to your other operating systems. I was poking around after I left that comment and couldn't find a working link to the old distro, though there are lots of how-to's on the subject using current mini-linux distributions. There'd be a fair learning curve on your part.

Take a look at http://www.linuxrouter.org/ if you're curious.
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