Solved

Objects as a data member of another class

Posted on 2003-12-08
6
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Last Modified: 2010-04-02
Hi,

In my design, I have a class A which contains an object of type B. Eg:

class A
{
private:
    B myBObject;

public:
    A();
    hello();
}

class B
{
private:
    int val;

public:
    B();
    someMethod();
}

In class A, by declaring an object of B eg:
B myObject;
does this mean that I already have an object of type B created in the stack?
Can I then do this:

A someAObject;
someAObject.myBObject.val = 5;

without having to create the B object?

OR:

In a method in class A can I just refer to the B object even though I haven't yet created an A object?
For example, in A's method hello() can I do this?

void A::hello()
{
    myBObject.val = 10;
}

even though nowhere have I actually created an A object or a B object except for the declaration of B in the class A?
0
Comment
Question by:garge
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6 Comments
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 9895457
1) Does this mean that I already have an object of type B created in the stack?
Object B is created in the same place where container object A is created. If A instance is on the stack, internal B object is on the stack.

2)
A someAObject;
someAObject.myBObject.val = 5;

This will not compile because myBObject is private. But if myBObject is public, it's OK.

3)
void A::hello()
{
   myBObject.val = 10;
}

It's OK.

0
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 9895463
myBObject is placed inside of A object. When A object is created, myBObject is created also. When A object is destroyed, myBObject is destroyed.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:monkesdb
ID: 9895479
if you only want a one way reference (only A contains a B and not the other way round). all you have to do is define the class B before you define the class A and you can do pretty much everything you expect.


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Author Comment

by:garge
ID: 9895527
1.  So when I create an A object, the B object also gets created automatically for me, that is the B constructor is automatically called?

2.  However, if instead, I don't have an object of B declared as:
B myBObject;

but as:
B *myBObject;

i.e a pointer to a B object, then somewhere, I would need to manually create the B object myself? eg:

A::hello()
{
    myBObject = new B();
}

3.  This may seem like a silly question, but if I declare a pointer to B, do I have to create an object of B in the heap using "new"?
Can I have something like this?

class A
{
    B *pointerBObj;
    hello();
}

void A::hello()
{
    B anObj;
    pointerBObj = anObj;
}


0
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 9895642
1) Yes

2, 3) If you keep a pointer to B as class A member, the best way is to create B object in A constructor and delete in destructor:

// A.h
class B;

class A
{
    public:
    A();
    ~A();
...
    B *pointerBObj;
};

// A.cpp
#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"


A::A()
{
    pointerBObj = new B();
}

A::~A()
{
    delete pointerBObj;
}

void A::AnyOtherFunction()
{
    // use pointer to B
    pointerBObj->AnyFunction();
}

Notice that B.h in this case is not included to A.h, only to A.cpp - this allows to remove circular include dependencies.
0
 
LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
AlexFM earned 150 total points
ID: 9895676
If you want to create temporary instance of B object in some specific function, you don't need B class member in A.

void A::hello()
{
   B b;
   // use b  
}

or

void A::hello()
{
   B* pb = new B();
   // use pb  
   delete bp;
}
0

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