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email question

Hi

I have redhat 9 running on a server in my office. I would like to setup a mail server for internal use. I was wondering is there any way to set it up so we can still just use our current main email addresses and not have to setup a local email address and have a normal email account.
Could we set it up so we send eveyones email to the linux box first instead of the internet and then have that send it out and there might be a way to setup something up to not send it to the internet and send it to the local mail server if it reconizes that the email is for a local email account. This is just a guess...
This want I want to do user1@ouroffice.com sends email to user2@ouroffice.com it goes to our redhat server it reads the fact that it is ment for a local user and doesnt send it out to the internet it just sends it to the users local email box. If the email was to bob@somewhere.com it would the send the email to him.

Thanks Onestar
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onestar
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onestar
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1 Solution
 
jlevieCommented:
That's not real difficult to do. You'd create accounts for all of your email users in the normal manner and set up the sendmail as if it was the mail server for your domain. You'll probably also want to use your service provider's email server as a smart host by including "define(`SMART_HOST',`smtp.your.provider')" in the sendmail.mc. I'd also recommend that you configure sendmail to masquerade as your domain so that replies will go to the right place. Build a new sendmail.cf and mail will work.

It sounds as if you already have a mail server with accounts for your users at your service provider. You can use fetchmail to retrieve mail from there and inject into the local email system, which means that your users only need to check mail on the local server.
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onestarAuthor Commented:
Thanks,

Is there any issues with sendmail if my local server doesn't have a registered domain name? I haven't played with sendmail very much. What is better and easier sendmail or qmail, I heard qmail is more secure. I have a friend who wants me to do this for his company too if I can figure it out first for mine. So I want to make sure I get it right the first time. I haven't done too much with email server setup. So I am not 100% on things.

Thanks Onestar

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jlevieCommented:
If you don't have a registered domain name you can't directly receive mail.  You can, however, set up a local mail server for a "dummy domain" and use fetchmail to retrieve mail from your ISP and inject that into the local mail server. For outgoing mail your server gets configured to use your ISP as a SMART HOST relay. Your users can read/send mail from/to the  local server, they just need to configure their client with a Reply-To set to be their address at your ISP.

Qmail is "designed to be secure" as is any late version of Sendmail (say 8.11 or later). With any program of that size the danger is that poor coding of some part may introduce a vulnerability. Sendmail is widely used and a lot of people look at the sendmail sources. Consequently it is very unlikely that a security vulnerability will go un-noticed or be found by crackers before a patch is distributed. The advantage of Sendmail, in my opinion, is that it is widely used and there are lots of resources available.
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Karl Heinz KremerCommented:

No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:
Answered by jlevie
Please leave any comments here within the next four days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

khkremer
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