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When to Dim variables - before or after 'On Error'

Posted on 2003-12-08
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Last Modified: 2010-05-01
Within a procedure/function or property:  Is it best to Dim variables before or after the 'On Error' statement?

For example:

Public Sub func()
   Dim sBuffer As String

   On Error Goto EH
   :
   :
   Exit Sub
EH:
   :

End Sub

or

Public Sub func()
   On Error Goto EH

   Dim sBuffer As String
   :
   :
   Exit Sub

EH:
   :
End Sub

Thanks.
0
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Question by:halfondj
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5 Comments
 
LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:TomLaw1999
TomLaw1999 earned 62 total points
ID: 9898950
Convention seems to be to dim varibles first.
0
 
LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:learning_t0_pr0gram
learning_t0_pr0gram earned 62 total points
ID: 9899778
I always dim the variables first...
0
 
LVL 86

Assisted Solution

by:Mike Tomlinson
Mike Tomlinson earned 62 total points
ID: 9901054
I always put my On Error at the top since it is only one line and it makes it very clear that Error trapping is occuring within the Function/Sub.
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
DaPen earned 64 total points
ID: 9901888
There are times when having the "On Error" command running with in your code can prevent errors from being passed properly (ActiveX Controls).  Also, sometimes you have to specifically place an "On Error" to a specific handler around a piece of code while the rest of the sub routine uses a different (generic) handler.  An example of this might be when the generic handler runs it always calls the specific handler code but under particular situations you only need to run the specific handler code.  All this being said, the best place to put an "On Error" statement is before the code that is going to use it.  "DIM" statements are not normally considered executable code and therefore placing an "On Error" before them would be of no use.
0
 

Author Comment

by:halfondj
ID: 9903737
Thanks for all the answers.  Since there doesn't seem to be a wrong answer, I split the points.
0

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