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Visual basic does not use line numbers as Fortran

Posted on 2003-12-09
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Last Modified: 2013-11-25
I am new at using visual basic. What I want to do is translate 25,000 lines of code that I did many years ago in Darthmoth Basic and update the program. Now Darthmouth basic uses line numbers where as MS Visual Basic does not. Is thare a way to refer to a line of code in a for else do loop, etc?

gonzal13(Joe)
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Question by:gonzal13
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7 Comments
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:leonstryker
ID: 9906489
You can create a label and the refer to it like:

Sub Test()
    GoTo LABEL
    Msgbox "Before"
LABEL:
    Msgbox "After"
End Sub

But, you should really think about recoding the methodaloggy of the program and utilize object oriented structures.

Leon
0
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:AzraSound
ID: 9906714
VB still understands line numbers and you can jump around to them using the GoTo statement.
0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
dasari earned 50 total points
ID: 9906831
I don't know about basic but u can something like this in VB as suggested above......the numbers here are actually labels and u can use  GOTO 2 or any line using labels.....

Example.....

Private Sub Command3_Click()
1: Dim Db
2: Dim Rs
3: Set Db = CurrentDb()
4: Set Rs = Db.OpenRecordset("SELECT * FROM TABLENAME")
5:
6: Rs.AddNew
7: Rs(0) = "XXX"
8: Rs(1) = "YYY"
9: Rs.Update
10:
11: Set Rs = Nothing
12: Set Db = Nothing
13:
End Sub
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LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:AzraSound
ID: 9906887
With numbers, you don't even need the colon afterwards.  That is reserved for alpha labels.
0
 
LVL 13

Author Comment

by:gonzal13
ID: 9906903
dasari


Thanks for your answer. You were the only one that provided the syntax

Gonzal13(Joe)
0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:leonstryker
ID: 9906971
A : symbol in VB designates an end of a line and the begining of the next one.  Technically you can write your code like this

Sub Test()
Dim x, y, z: x = 1: y = 2: z = 1: If y = 2 Then MsgBox x + x + y * y - z
End Sub

BTW, I think this question should have been a split at best.

Leon
0
 
LVL 13

Author Comment

by:gonzal13
ID: 9907819
Okay:

I am sure that splitting the points would be Ok although the amound is very low and already has been awarded before your comment came in. Therefore, I shall leave everything as they are.

I think I shall get another book on Visual Basic. The one I have, is very basic and does cover my needs.



gonzal13 (Joe)
0

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