Still celebrating National IT Professionals Day with 3 months of free Premium Membership. Use Code ITDAY17

x
?
Solved

Replacing drives in RAID 1

Posted on 2003-12-09
9
Medium Priority
?
676 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-03
I have an Adaptec SCSI RAID controller with two Seagate 9.11 GB drives mirrored as RAID 1. I want to replace both of these drives with larger capacity. I have two partitions C: for Win2K and D: for data.

Can I install one new drive as a spare and change it to be the mirror, then remove the original mirror, then make the new drive the primary, and then install the second new drive as the mirror?

Or is there a better way to replace the drives and preserve all OS and data?
0
Comment
Question by:vogtster
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
9 Comments
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:LucF
ID: 9906909
Hi vogtster,

I think creating an image with a program like Norton Ghost, then change the drives (create a mirrored array again) then write back the image is the easiest solution to do this. Or you can add the two drives to start with, then use Ghost to clone the original array onto the new one. Then set the SCSI Bios to boot from the newly created array. Afterwards, after you've found that everything is running fine, you can use the old drives for extra storage.

Greetings,

LucF
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Andrewhsia
ID: 9908545
I agree, though I prefer Power quest 2002.
If you swap a large one for one of the small ones, it will create it as the same size as the small one.
so if you change one of the 9gb drives for a 36gb drive, it will make the drive a 9gb drive. So it does you no good. After you change the other one, then you would have to use like partion magic to make the partion larger.
0
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
raybass earned 2000 total points
ID: 9910282
I feel the best way is to do this:

1. Break the Mirror in the SCSI Bios, then remove one drive.  Make sure you can boot.
2. Using Symantec Ghost (not PQ), Ghost from the 9 gig to the new, larger hard drive.  It will maximize the capacity of the disk this way.
3. Make sure you can boot from the new larger drive.
4. Add the second larger hard drive and reconstruct the mirror in the SCSI Bios.
5. Make sure you can boot.  :)  Otherwise, you still have that 9 gig scsi you removed in the first step.

Ghost is your best bet because you can resize the partitions while moving them.  When you ghost, it will actually come up with a dialog box asking what size to make each partition, so you can keep your C the same while giving all the extra space to D, or vice versa, or increase them both.

Good Luck!
0
Back Up Your Microsoft Windows Server®

Back up all your Microsoft Windows Server – on-premises, in remote locations, in private and hybrid clouds. Your entire Windows Server will be backed up in one easy step with patented, block-level disk imaging. We achieve RTOs (recovery time objectives) as low as 15 seconds.

 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:LucF
ID: 9910388
>After you change the other one, then you would have to use like partion magic to make the partion larger.
Partition magic can't be used on server versions of windows and this creates one extra step of failure. So I really recommend my way. Just make sure you keep the 9.11 GB drive alive until you're sure that everything works fine.
0
 

Author Comment

by:vogtster
ID: 9912710
I like raybass's solution (that's what I was trying to describe in my original question) but I have read that Ghost does not support NTFS. My question is what NTFS function does it not support? Ghost most likely bit copies one drive to another, so NTFS is not an issue. Could it be that Ghost can't read or write NTFS when doing something less than a whole disk copy?
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:LucF
ID: 9912732
>>I have read that Ghost does not support NTFS.
Where did you read that?

http://www.symantec.com/sabu/ghost/ghost_personal/sys_req.html
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:LucF
ID: 9912777
I hope you don't use dynamic drives: http://tinyurl.com/ylj9
For information about cloning a server: http://tinyurl.com/yljj
0
 

Author Comment

by:vogtster
ID: 9913100
A user review from 11/2002. Maybe it was an older version.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,4149,28498,00.asp
0
 
LVL 56

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 9913293
There is an easier way which probably works with your controller; replace one drive with bigger one, let it rebuild the array - may take quite a while, then replace the other drive with bigger one. Now in drive manager you'll probably see a bigger drive so you can use the rest under a different drive letter. No downtime this way and it works on most RAID controllers. Don't do this with dynamic disks either.
0

Featured Post

[Webinar] Lessons on Recovering from Petya

Skyport is working hard to help customers recover from recent attacks, like the Petya worm. This work has brought to light some important lessons. New malware attacks like this can take down your entire environment. Learn from others mistakes on how to prevent Petya like worms.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Each year, investment in cloud platforms grows more than 20% (https://www.immun.io/hubfs/Immunio_2016/Content/Marketing/Cloud-Security-Report-2016.pdf?submissionGuid=a8d80a00-6fee-4b85-81db-a4e28f681762) as an increasing number of companies begin to…
Compliance and data security require steps be taken to prevent unauthorized users from copying data.  Here's one method to prevent data theft via USB drives (and writable optical media).
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of installing the necessary services and then configuring a Windows Server 2012 system as an iSCSI target. To install the necessary roles, go to Server Manager, and select Add Roles and Featu…
This Micro Tutorial will teach you how to reformat your flash drive. Sometimes your flash drive may have issues carrying files so this will completely restore it to manufacturing settings. Make sure to backup all files before reformatting. This w…
Suggested Courses

722 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question