Solved

Can't install my PCI Networking Card

Posted on 2003-12-09
5
371 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I just bought a Netgear Wireless G NIC, it's a 32 bit PCI Card, but the system doesn't boot up when I plug it in. I noticed that I cannot plug it into the socket completely.. this is an old motherboard (3 or 4 years)... however, should I be able to plug it in anyway? is it possible that it doesn't accept 32 bit PCI Cards?

Thanks

Alfonso Olvera
0
Comment
Question by:oLvErA
  • 2
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Gnart
ID: 9909430
You said "is it possible thta it doesn't accept 32 bit PCI cards?"  hmmm, ISA, EISA, PCI, AGP adapters have their own matching slots.... you shouldn't be able to put one into the other unless using extra ordinary efforts (grin).... the PCI slot is normally white.... The card should go in easy unless the bracket is keeping it out.....
ISA is black, EISA is brown, I forgot AGP - has to open my machine later.

cheers
0
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Gnart
ID: 9909433
Sorry for double post, 3 or 4 years MB should have PCI slots.... it may be the bracket itself.... you may have to play with the bracket to get it to sit properly.

cheers...
0
 

Author Comment

by:oLvErA
ID: 9909531
Alright, now.. the problem I see, and the difference I see with other cards, is that instead of having only one gap in the socket (like 2 sections, it has 3..), there's 2 gaps, it goes like this :

||||||-||||||||||||||||||||||||-||||||

Instead of

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||-||||||

but it should still sit right?

Thanks a lot
Alfonso
0
 
LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
chicagoan earned 500 total points
ID: 9909818
If the key on you PCI slots is closer to the chassis slots, it uses 3.3v signalling.
If the key on you PCI slots is farther away from the chassis slots, it uses 5v signalling.
If there are 2 keys on you PCI slots, they should provide both 3.3 and 5v signalling

Many older motherboards do not provide 3.3V power to the PCI connectors
Because of that, most PCI cards with 3.3V-powered components have to regulate their own 3.3V.
A PCI card which is keyed as you describe should work in any PCI slot.
I looked at Netgear's specs on the WAG311 but it make no mention of PCI signalling requirements, it would be unusual to manufacture a card keyed this way that didn't conform to the standard.
I have seen card/slot combinations that very very difficult to physically insert.
The judicious use of a graphite pencil on only the outside curve of the pc-board material of the card may help it slip in. If the card is not fully seated it can cause a short that will prevent the machine from booting.
If it genuinely doesn't fit, don't resort to pounding, simply swearing will suffice.


0
 

Author Comment

by:oLvErA
ID: 9910122
It's actually the WAG311.. how did you know that? hahah..

I'm gonna keep trying tomorrow... Thanks a lot!

Alfonso Olvera
0

Featured Post

Do You Know the 4 Main Threat Actor Types?

Do you know the main threat actor types? Most attackers fall into one of four categories, each with their own favored tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Join & Write a Comment

The Rasberry PI is a low cost piece of hardware that you can have a lot of fun with through experimenting and building/working on projects like media players, running a low cost computer, build data loggers etc. - see: https://www.raspberrypi.org
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…

757 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

19 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now