Net::RawIP, getopts.pl

what is the meaning of these lines ?Thank you


#!/usr/bin/perl

require 'getopts.pl';
use Net::RawIP;
use IO::Socket;

Getopts('s:d:p:q:w:t:');
$synPacket = new Net::RawIP;
$ackPacket = new Net::RawIP;

die "Usage $0 -s <IP source> -d <IP destination> -p <source port> -q <dest port> -w <window> -t <ttl>"
unless ($opt_s && $opt_d && $opt_p && $opt_q && $opt_w);
bertinoflexAsked:
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mrh30Commented:
Net::RawIP is a module for manipulating raw IP packets.  See http://search.cpan.org/~skolychev/Net-RawIP-0.1/RawIP.pm for details.

getopts.pl could be anything!  The require before it just means that if it hasn't been loaded already it will be loaded.  There's no way of telling from this code which getops will actually do.

The most likely explanation is that Getopts('s:d:p:q:w:t:') is a function supplied by getopts.pl and that this plucks the command line arguments and puts them in $opt_s etc appropriately.
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PurplePerlsCommented:
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mrh30Commented:
PurplePerls: There's no guarantee that getopts.pl is the same one though.  It could be anything with the same file name.
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PurplePerlsCommented:
From the upper link:
;# getopts.pl - a better getopt.pl

;# Usage:
;#      do Getopts('a:bc');  # -a takes arg. -b & -c not. Sets opt_* as a
;#                           #  side effect.

Of course you are true, it could be anything but getting options :)

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mrh30Commented:
I do also agree with you though - it is certainly the most likely candidate! :-)
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Nothing has happened on this question in more than 7 weeks. It's time for cleanup!

My recommendation, which I will post in the Cleanup topic area, is to
split points between mrh30 and PurplePerls.

Please leave any comments here within the next seven days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

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