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How can I change the font size of a edit box?

Hi,
I'm trying to change the font size of the edit box I create in the child area of my main window. I use the following code to create this window:

////////////////////////////////////
int CChildView::OnCreate(LPCREATESTRUCT lpCreateStruct)
{
if (CWnd ::OnCreate(lpCreateStruct) == -1)
      return -1;
      
// CEdit* m_pEdit -->declared in .h file
      m_pEdit = new CEdit();
      m_pEdit->Create(WS_CHILD|WS_VISIBLE|WS_BORDER,
            CRect(0, 0, 100, 100), this, ID_TERMSCREEN);

      CFont m_Font;
      m_Font.CreateFont(28,20,0,0,FW_BOLD,FALSE,FALSE,0,DEFAULT_CHARSET,
            OUT_CHARACTER_PRECIS, CLIP_CHARACTER_PRECIS,DEFAULT_QUALITY, DEFAULT_PITCH,NULL);

      m_pEdit->SetFont(&m_Font, TRUE);

      UpdateData(FALSE);

      return 0;
}
///////////////////////////////////////////

Unfortunately the font size never changes. Only the cursor size increases, but when I write something in the edit box it uses the default font. What should I do more or where should I call SetFont ?
0
selinmetin
Asked:
selinmetin
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1 Solution
 
AndyAinscowCommented:
have      CFont m_Font; declared in the header file so it is a member variable for the class
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selinmetinAuthor Commented:
Well, thanks. I managed this. I don't need to make m_Font a member of the class. Instead, I should have made m_Font a pointer to the created font and use this pointer when calling SetFont. ie:

CFont* m_Font = new CFont();
m_Font.CreateFont(28,20,0,0,FW_BOLD,FALSE,FALSE,0,DEFAULT_CHARSET,
          OUT_CHARACTER_PRECIS, CLIP_CHARACTER_PRECIS,DEFAULT_QUALITY, DEFAULT_PITCH,NULL);

     m_pEdit->SetFont(m_Font);

// no need to call UpdateData();

But now I have problem with the background color. I'm actually using Windows CE .net 4.1. In Win32 I can set the background automatically by the following in OnCtlColor function:

      if (nCtlColor == CTLCOLOR_STATIC) {
            pDC->SetBkColor(RGB(0, 0, 0));
            pDC->SetTextColor(RGB(0, 255, 0));
            return (HBRUSH)m_termBrush;
      }
// m_termBrush is a class member formerly created.

But the background is not painted instantly, instead with every letter processed the background of the character is painted. Is there something specific with Windows CE?

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AndyAinscowCommented:
You had originally set it as the pointer by using &m_Font so I don't see why it should make a difference (unless it is Win CE that is).

0
 
KurtVonCommented:
The difference is that when it wasn't a pointer, the m_Font was freed when the function exited and the font was deleted by teh system.  Now that it is a pointer the destructor is never called, so the font is still there.  Unfortunately, it is never freed and therefore uses up GDI resources and leaks memory.

The original suggestion of putting the font in teh header was the correct solution.  You need to keep the font alive while it is needed by the edit control, but just as importantly, the font must be freed when it is no longer needed or you will leak memory and GDI resources.

Also, SetBkColor sets the background color for text, not for the control.  To change the color of the control you need to return an HBRUSH with the color you wants elected into it.

Hope this helps.
0
 
KurtVonCommented:
And if this is a multiline edit control OnCtlColor won't color the additional lines until text is put in them.  You need to subclass the control and override the OnEraseBkgnd function.
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