Joining a Domain Without a Domain Present

Hi ya all,

Every now and then we(the place i work at) are required to do clean install on old equipment or install new systems for other companies. I'm just finishing off my first one now. However the client has a domain. To fully setup there pc i need to join it to there domain. I would really prefer not to have to 1. Visit the Client Premises. 2 Have to do it remotely later on. Is there any way of forcing the machine to join a domain that isn't present. I am rather doubtfull but thought i would ask.

Secondly if it's not possible to join a non-existent domain, is there any way of using a script/command to do the same thing when the pc is turned on?

Thanks

Stewart
sjmcleanAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

tstaddonCommented:
What you can do, is use the Setup Manager to generate an unattend file called SYSPREP.INF, which will join the machine to the domain when it is rebooted. Use Setup Manager (documented in the Help section of Windows 2000) to create an unattended mini-setup.

For a step-by-step description, have a look at http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=298491 which walks you through the process.

It should contain the following lines:

[Identification]
JoinDomain=MYDOMAINNAME
DomainAdmin=Administrator
DomainAdminPassword=Password

Here, all you do is specify the domain name, admin account to use, and the password for the admin account. Once the machine boots up, it will perform the setup as you described it in Setup Manager, and then join the domain.

You can fully automate and restrict this mini-setup, so that the user at the other end doesn't have to do anything other than perhaps click on a couple of OK buttons.

When you run SYSPREP itself, use the -NOSIDGEN switch if it's a one-off build for that machine only. This will mean that the workstation will retain its own security ID.

If you use GHOST, omit this switch and use -PNP instead; this forces the machine to check for new hardware during the mini-setup.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows 2000

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.