Solved

Problems starting X Server

Posted on 2003-12-10
12
577 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
When I boot my Debian Linux machine, I get this message:
I cannot start the X server (your graphical interface). It is likely that it is not set up correctly. Would you like to view the X server output to diagnose the problem?

If you choose yes, then it shows a grey window with "(100%)" in the bottom right hand corner of it, an exit option right below that and in the center, and a blue back ground. Other wise, the window is blank.

When I choose to exit that screen, it gives me a message that says, "Would you like me to try to run the X configureation program? Note that you will need the root password for this."
I choose yes, and it goes back to the command prompt for a second, and then brings back up a grey screen on the blue background and says, "I will now try to restart the X server again" and it then gives me the original "cannot start the X server" message.

If I click no, it says, "I will disable this X server for now. Restart GDM when it is onfigured correctly."
Then it goes back to my command prompt login.

Then I login as root and try this:

SteveLinux:~# startx
 /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/xinit/xserverrc:/usr/bin/X11/X: No such file or directory
/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/xinit/xserverrc: exec: /usr/bin/X11/X: connot execute: No such file or directory
giving up.
xinit: Connection refused (errno 111): unable to connect to X server
xinit: No such process (errno 3): Server error.

And I try this too:
SteveLinux:~# gdm
gdm already running. Aborting!

Can you guys help me get my display running? My number one priority right now is getting on to the internet with this machine, then I can play around with stuff and figure it out.
0
Comment
Question by:crazyhead
  • 6
  • 5
12 Comments
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
Comment Utility
run  xf86config.
select your video card(or generic if u are in doubt).

and see if it works.
0
 

Author Comment

by:crazyhead
Comment Utility
I ran the program, and it did not work. I selected a generic VGA adapter and it did not work. I didn't know what kind of monitor information is was asking, so I chose the most basic and first options. It gives me the exact same errors as before when I try to run it.
0
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
Comment Utility
Do u have X rpm installed on your system. could u check these very quickly.

what does it say.
#which X

#cd /usr/bin/X11/
ls -l
0
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
Comment Utility
also do u know which graphic card u have and do u have drivers for those card.
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:dorward
Comment Utility
Try running:  

/etc/init.d/gdm stop
X -configure

Hopefully that will autogenerate a config file for you that you can copy to /etc/X11/XF86conf-4
0
 

Author Comment

by:crazyhead
Comment Utility
shivsa:
I used the command you gave me, but got no result. I also tried the following:
which X
which x
which suck
which you better answer me you giant piece of crap

Yet, nothing.
I moved to the /usr/bin/X11 directory, but did not know what to do after that. (I used the ls -l command, but did not know what to look for)
And as long as I am looking for stuff, how do I scroll the contents of those results which are too large for my sreen?

I am using a NumberNine SR9 with 16mg of RAM.


dorward:
I tried to run gdm stop in the /etc/init.d/ directory, but it gave me the error "gdm already running. Aborting!"
I attempted to run X -configure anyway, and it said "bash: X: command not found"


*steve laughs at his shamefull newbie self*
Anything else guys?
0
6 Surprising Benefits of Threat Intelligence

All sorts of threat intelligence is available on the web. Intelligence you can learn from, and use to anticipate and prepare for future attacks.

 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
Comment Utility
u have to look for X in /usr/bin/X11 directory.
ls -l | more and look for file X. <--- this will give input  one screen one time, space will move to another screen.

just do
ls -l X in this dir and post the result. if it a link to some thing then do ls -l fo that link too.
0
 

Author Comment

by:crazyhead
Comment Utility
Do you need the information that comes with the -l flag? This is a seperate computer, and I don't know how to get all that information over here with out retyping it all.
0
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:shivsa
Comment Utility
yes just send me what it print when u tyrp
ls -l X
0
 

Author Comment

by:crazyhead
Comment Utility
SteveLinux:/usr/bin/X11# ls -l X
ls: X: No such file or directory

I belive I did that in the directory you spoke of...just to be sure, I tried it in the /usr/bin/ directory and the root (/) directory.
0
 
LVL 24

Accepted Solution

by:
shivsa earned 250 total points
Comment Utility
it confirms that u do not X installed on your system.
u have to get X server installed on your server to get goin.
solve the problem by dselect as root, downloading the xfree86-xserver and associated files. install it.
and then  run  xf86config. u will be ok.


0
 

Author Comment

by:crazyhead
Comment Utility
Awsome! Its working now. (to bad it so slow, thats what I get for running it on a P-266 I supose) This has been bugging me for a long time, thank you very much!
0

Featured Post

Get up to 2TB FREE CLOUD per backup license!

An exclusive Black Friday offer just for Expert Exchange audience! Buy any of our top-rated backup solutions & get up to 2TB free cloud per system! Perform local & cloud backup in the same step, and restore instantly—anytime, anywhere. Grab this deal now before it disappears!

Join & Write a Comment

Suggested Solutions

How many times have you wanted to quickly do the same thing to a list but found yourself typing it again and again? I first figured out a small time saver with the up arrow to recall the last command but that can only get you so far if you have a bi…
Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

743 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

16 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now