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DNS Recommendation

Posted on 2003-12-11
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I have 650 users, that previously were not using DNS.  This is the largest environment I've ever set up DNS in.  I plan to use only two DNS servers, on in our main site and one in our largest secondary site.  I was wondering if I could get any recommendations as far as hardware that I would need to support DNS.  The servers, for now, would be exclusively DNS, at a later date the on at the remote site may become a DC.  I'm just not sure how powerful of a server will be needed to handle requests.  There is not supposed to be a lot of web traffic so there shouldn't be all to many name resolution requests there.
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Question by:mynamebecory2
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by:PsiCop
ID: 9920689
The answer to your question depends greatly on the OS platform you plan to use for your servers.

If you're going to run on *NIX or Linux, go scrape up some retired Proliant 1500 or some similar machine and it'll do well.

If you're going to use a resource pig like Windoze, well, throw everything you've got at it.
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by:mynamebecory2
ID: 9920749
I know one of them for sure will be Windows 2k.  The other will be either OpenBSD or RedHat.  What would you suggest for the Windows Server, as far as RAM, Proc . . .
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qwaletee earned 135 total points
ID: 9920997
DNS is a fairly low resource service. If you have an existing server that is not already loaded, and you don't expect it to become loaded, you can just add it there.  Rememeber, even though every connection needs to look up the host IP...

1) For persistent connections, it nly has to be looked up once.  Once the TCP socket connects, it never loks up again

2) Even for make/break/make applications (e.g., browsers), typically, the client caches the lookup

3) The entire lookup is a tiny affair.  You have what, maybe 700, 750 host names internally? And most of those are clients that will never be connected to.  So, the inerbal caching is at most a few dozen items.  Every else will be a referral, which uses a tiny bit of network traffic, and a tiny bit of data.  Very little data needs to be cached as it does the lookup.
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Expert Comment

by:TIMFOX123
ID: 9932688
I agree but would like to add that you can use a linux Bind dns server but M$ will make it more agravation that it is worth.  

Also make sure  you have mutiple DNS servers.  If you have the bandwidth and the servers, three would not be unheard of but two would do.
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