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linksys wireless router, 2 NICs, ICS, a hub, DHCP, and a cable modem

Posted on 2003-12-11
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Last Modified: 2007-02-12
I have my network setup, where the cable modem is plugged into my home pc.
The pc has 2 NICs, so all I do is turn on ICS, and plug the other NIC into my hub.

Now any pc/laptop I hook up to the hub gets internet immediately.

So I now have a wireless AP router from linksys.
I want to simply plug it into the hub, and have it route wireless requests through my pc, just as any other thing connected to the hub does. Can't seem to get it to work just right.

Can I do this? I have the Uplink connected to my hub. Not sure what to do with the WAN, but I seem to get it semi working by plugging that into the hub too. I get it slightly working if I set my wireless laptop to a static ip and stuff, but I want the router to take care of DHCP for the wireless side (and leave ICS taking care of the DHCP on the wired side).

there must be a way to do it - i just don't know the settings and stuff....

any help would be great!

Thanks
R
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Question by:rderidder
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12 Comments
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:qwaletee
ID: 9920868
WHy are you bothering?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!??!?!?!??!??!??!??!????!??!??!??!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!??!?

You have this picture in your head:

Hub <- PC w/2 NICs <- Internet
|
|------ Linksys wirelss router ...........any...wirless....PC.....
|
|--- wired PC



It should be:

Hub <- Linksys wireless router <- Internet
|             ...
|             ...
|             .........any....wireless....PC
|
|---Your old 2 NIC PC
|
|---Any other wired PC
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:qwaletee
ID: 9920901
If you do it like I described, everyting just happens "naturally."  You may not even need the hub, because most of the wireless SOHO routers have **several** LAN ports built in as well.

What do I mean by "naturaly?"

This is what the routers are built for.  They have a DHCP server to assign interbal addresses to any PC that reuqests one (you have to set the PCs to "automatically obtain an IP address," instead of using a static address). As the address is assigned automatically, the router also tells the PC that for any internet traffic, it shoudl send requsts to the router.  The router then forwards this traffic to the internet, much as your old 2-NIC PC used to.  At tispointy, since the 2-NICer doesn't need to perform that function anymore, it ust gets used as a regular PC (at least, as far as network trafic is concerned).

the above aplies to both wired and wireless PCs that connect to the router.  Usually, there is little to no configuration required, but your 2-NICer may need some tweaking. you were probably running ICS on it (which is Windows-acting-ust-like-the-Linksys).  It may siply be a metter of setting both NICs to automatically obtain an IP address, and removing any software your DSL/Canle company had you install.
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Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9920914
i could go that way... but then there are more settings to get to know anyway, since I host a website as well, so I think it will take a few more settings to allow the web to access my pc.

The website obviously has it's ip address change every so often, so I have a process already in place which monitors the ip change of the outgoing nic, and notifies the forwarding site about it.

If that can be set up easier, I'm all for it, I just thought that plugging the router into my hub would actually be simpler to set up.

R
0
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Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9921019
is it possible to do it the way I first mentioned though?

even though it may seem unnatural for the router?

I have gotten it to the point where it correctly dhcp's ips tot he wireless laptop, while conneted to my wired side.
But every 2 seconds the router resets itself, until it no longer provides a signal. So I can't test if it will work perfectly.
again, this is with the weird setting of having both the Uplink,a nd the WAN plugged into my hub.

R
0
 

Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9921050
the WAN is set to obtain IP automatically, which I suppose it should, from my pc, and the ICS taking care of dhcp on the wired side.

'course then it's like there are 2 dhcp servers on the network, but I don't see any errors in my event log about that...
Maybe the router only dhcps to the wireless side somehow?
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Insolence
ID: 9927156
Yes it is perfectly possible.  In a way.  Your router must be able to BRIDGE instead of being a gateway/router.  If you want to do what you sound like you want to do, go return your Linksys wireless ROUTER and go pick up a bridge.  It's exactly what you want.  =)

Some routers can enable bridge mode though.  I believe the microsoft one, and I know apple's wireless routers support both routing and bridging modes.

Or... you could setup your router to host a new private network, using your hub as it's internet connection.  This is basically the same default setup that almost all the routers/gateways come with when you first buy them.  It will host it's own DHCP server onto all LAN ports, and get it's internet from it's WAN ports (or uplink, depending on what your router calls it).  If you set it up like this though, your wired computers will not be able to talk to your wireless computers... (but your wireless computers will be able to talk to your wired computers in most cases)

Hope that helps!

 - I
0
 

Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9927794
thats helps, but If you could give me more detail on the exact hookups for you last suggestion, that would be great.

My router (linksys BEFW11S4) has an uplink and a WAN port along with other regular ports.

So which one goes to the hub? Both?

The WAN feeds the router the network I guess... but the hub isn't accessible to set up unless it's Uplink is connected to the HUB.

I have found some interesting suggestions on linksys's site... I will be trying those as well.

Thanks
R

0
 
LVL 31

Assisted Solution

by:qwaletee
qwaletee earned 160 total points
ID: 9929387
If you Uplink to the hub, you will have the wirless router acting as just an AP, which is all you really need.  The WAN port ends up being unused.  The only issue is that it runs a DHCP server that will be on the same network as all your old equipment, and if you already have a DHCP server, that will conflict. So, you can just turn off the router';s DHCP server.

This makes no use whatsoever ofthe router's firewall and NAT features, it just acts as a "wireless hub" (which is what an access point is, logically).  Probably cost abot $30-$40 more than just an AP, but, you have it, the thing works, and you are done.

By the way, the fact that you are running a web site with a dynamic IP doesn't really change things much from my original proposal.  You would need only the following:

1) Server uses a static IP within the router's internal subnet; that IP should be outside teh range of therouter's DHCP server available dynamic addresses

2) Router set to forward web traffic to server (an easy change)

3) Set your dynamic DNS client (which you already described) to do a web-based IP update, instead of just checkinghe curent IP address.  If your current one does not do this, there are plenty out there that do. Which dynamic DNS service do you use?
0
 

Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9929488
Thats what I thought. Though when I turn off DHCP, my wireless laptop doesn't seem to get an IP from my server. Maybe the router has to be told to allow this to happen... ?

I may resort to using the router for all it's worth... But right now I would like to work it into my current set up.

My dynamic DNS is a little trick I made 5 years ago that is still running.
I have a batch file that runs every hour. It grabs the current IP address, and generates a forwarding web page. It then ftp's this forwarding webpage to a cheap free web hosting site. my domain is permently set up to forward to this free web hosting site, but users are immediately forwarded to my actual home computer website.

It's the settings in your step 2 that I would have to figure out rather then figuring out why the router is not letting my wireless laptop get an ip assigned.

Thanks
R
0
 

Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9930403
okay, it works now. It seems it just needed to have everything rebooted i guess.

if someone can give me the detailed version of steps 1,2 and 3 that qwaletee gave, then I will accept that as an answer for the alternate solution.

Thanks,
R
0
 
LVL 5

Accepted Solution

by:
Insolence earned 340 total points
ID: 9932665
#1: Setup your router to use DHCP (since you said it uses DHCP to get an IP), and set the internal network's gateway's IP to be lets say... 192.168.0.1, and make sure to tell it to host DHCP on your local network.  If it lets you pick the range, put 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.200.

#2: Change your server, disable ICS, disable DHCP server on your server (which is disabled automatically if you're using ICS) and change your server's IP to 192.168.0.10 with subnet of 255.255.255.0, and gateway of 192.168.0.1.  Make sure from within' your LAN you can still hit your webpage that's being hosted by going to http://192.168.0.10 in your web browser from within' your LAN.  If that works, then...

#3: Log back into your router's configuration page, and set Port Forwarding to forward port 80 to 192.168.0.10.  This is a very secure approach by only opening one port for incoming traffic.  If you need other services (mail server, dns server, etc) then you'll have to open those ports too.  But it sounds like you just need port 80.  If you're using a secure webserver, open up port 443 to your server also.

#4: Most Dynamic IP/Name programs automatically do this feature.  Just make sure to run it and test if your dynamic DNS resolves to your public IP address.  If it doesn't, you can modify your script a bit to find your real IP address automatically by filtering the data from, say, www.whatismyipaddress.com, or one of the many other services out there that tell you your IP.  =)

 - I
0
 

Author Comment

by:rderidder
ID: 9932774
thanks for the detail. Yeah, I have a secure set of pages as well.

Thanks again guys,

R
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