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RAID 5 move

Posted on 2003-12-11
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Last Modified: 2010-04-14
I am about to remove a complete RAID 5 array from a server in order to raplace it with larger disks.  Besides my security backups that I'll perform beforehand, I was wondering something about the array as is before the removal.  Say I would want to put the removed disks of the array back into the server in the same locations and order, would the system be able to read the data again after I would recreate the array?  This is one of those things about which you wonder once in a while and it's been driving me crazy on occasions.  This is about knowing for the sake of it.

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:TechnoBuzz
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JConchie earned 50 total points
ID: 9922505
When you remove the drives, all the data will be intact on them......unless something then subsequently damages the drives. .....you should be able to reinstall the drives, recreate the array......and read data.  This would probably work better if the original array was on a hardware raid controller and you were reinstalling the original controller.

Of course, the keywords above are "should be able to".........common sense, and good practices say that you do a good backup (and do a test restore on a file or two, to make sure it is a good backup) prior to making any significant changes to your system........as you are doing.
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by:PaulHieb
ID: 9923472
Yes assuming two things:

If using Hardware RAID, generally speaking, it must be the same type/model controller.

If using Windows 2000/2003 software RAID all should go smoothly, just follow any Microsoft recommendations that you can find on handling 2000 software RAID.
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