We help IT Professionals succeed at work.

BLUR all of an image EXCEPT white 255,255,255 (ImageMagick?)

GP1628
GP1628 asked
on
339 Views
Last Modified: 2008-03-10
OK Im trying to blur an image but leave a color untouched. Actually I would like to leave 3 colors untouched but just one would work.
Alternativly, an example of setting a mask?
Alternatively an example of copying all the white pixels to a new image so I can merge tham back opague after the blurring?

Preferences are:
linux, command-line, imagemagick or gimp script,
starting image is a targa but conversions are simple so any format will do
colors are 255/255/255, 195/87/44, 44/135/195

This works in GIMP but I would rather batch process it.....
load .tga and open layers
for 3 colors
  rclick image, select-> by color, choose color, Shft-Ctrl-L
  go to layers, clik "keep transp", clik "new layer"
next color
after getting 3 transparent floating layers, select blur
Ctrl-M to merge all layers then save

I will increase the points if all of my wishlist is met.
My next option seems as though it might be to post this into the programmers territory
Comment
Watch Question

Commented:
I could tell you how to do it in Photoshop, but not in the program youre after.

Commented:
Try doing it in photoshop. Can be done very easily in photoshop.
1. Select the colors you want to leave untouched.
2. Copy and paste in a new layer.
3. Apply blur to the original layer, using Filter > blur > gaussian blur.

Author

Commented:
Actually I have a way to do it in GIMP which has some advantages on PhotoShop.
Im afraid I dont see where PS offers any advantages for what I want to do.
Commented:
This one is on us!
(Get your first solution completely free - no credit card required)
UNLOCK SOLUTION

Author

Commented:
rats I didnt get in in time.
That answer didnt really help me since the server does not run any GUI environment.
I would still rather have a command-line command for it.
But thats OK. I just recently managed to get the original map-generation program updated to nearly the same effect.
Unlock the solution to this question.
Join our community and discover your potential

Experts Exchange is the only place where you can interact directly with leading experts in the technology field. Become a member today and access the collective knowledge of thousands of technology experts.

*This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

OR

Please enter a first name

Please enter a last name

8+ characters (letters, numbers, and a symbol)

By clicking, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.