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Temperatures

Posted on 2004-03-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
I'm after some idea of what to expect in terms of CPU temp for a hyperthreaded Pent4 - 3.06 GHz CPU. I'm running it with both CPU-halves pinned at 100 % usage for several tens of minutes, and would like to get some idea of what CPU temp others get under these circumstances.

I've been working on the cooling and noise of my system, and want to know if I'm getting there or not. In an ambient temp of 32 C, I get Motherboard temps of 31-32 C, CPU at 39 C at idle, rising to 48 under 100 % of one CPU, and 55 with both going.

My major issue is that it is too loud, so I'm looking at insulating the case and putting it in a cabinet, but I want to make sure it's going to run like this reliably. As it's my TV, DVD, Stereo, CD Player, Radio, VCR and Computer, it's a pain when it goes down!
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Question by:gbentley
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by:roadhog_NZ
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I hope thats not excessive coz im running a few P4's constantly at around 65 C,

other comments will be of interest
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by:gbentley
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I wish I could run it at 65 C!

As soon as it goes over about 55-60 it shuts down. I'm still not real sure why as the limit is set at 72C. I'm a little suspicious that the PSU is actually shutting it down, but can't find any way to be sure about that.
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by:Callandor
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Here's a list of P4 cpu specs: http://www.cpuscorecard.com/cpuprices/ip4.htm
The 3.06 has a limit of 74C, but if you are shutting down at 55-60, it could be the BIOS or the power supply.  Even so, your case should be cooled more so that your max temperatures are lower, closer to 40.  Use larger, slower fans if noise is an issue - I have found 80mm Panaflo fans to be very good for this.
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by:woodchuck3786
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There should be an option in your BIOS to set the temperature for emergency shutdown. Check your BIOS manual. Anything over 60C is pushin the limits.
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by:buckeyes33
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just remember that no matter what temperature that you set your temperature at in the bios the computer will shut off when the proccessor reachs 74C.  
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by:gbentley
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Thanks for the comments.

I did some more testing last night, and found that running the stress test only pushed the CPU to 54 C. Nothing I could find would take it over that, so my efforts seem to have had the desired result.

I would still be interested in what temps others are seeing, particularly in high ambient temps like 35-40 C. Ultimately I'd like to be able to keep it running when it's 40 C in the room which happens once a year or so.

Callandor - Do you mean that I should be able to keep the CPU at 40-45 regardless of the load? It will certainly sit at that temp under "normal" load (5-10% CPU usage total), but stressing it will push it up. I'm using 80 mm fans already. I think the main problem with noise is that the case is an all alloy one, and is quite light.

The next thing I'm going to try is to line the side panels and top of the case with sound deadening material used in car doors by the car hifi nuts. If I can kill the vibration, I can live with the "whoose" of air through the vents.



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Callandor earned 125 total points
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I rechecked my numbers and see that they are in line with what you see: 40C at idle, and 55C at 100% cpu.  What I did to reduce noise was to get an Enermax power supply (which has quieter fans), unplug the Northbridge chipset fan and plug in an 80mm case fan, use a Zalman fanless video cpu heatsink, and put the case in a cabinet with closed doors and use a Gyration wireless keyboard and mouse.
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by:gbentley
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Thanks for that Callandor. That s pretty much where I'm heading as far as the noise goes, put it in a cabinet.



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by:tpilg
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You're lucky that you have a Pentium chip. Apparently they simply get slower and slower the hotter they get, and cannot ever get hot enough to burn out even if you take off the heatsink and fan. Unlike AMD's that can shoot up to 170C and burn out if the heatsink and fan fail.
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by:roadhog_NZ
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Yay, Just got the new gigabyte cooler master 3D CPU fan, man goodbye high temps....

3GHz overclocked to 3.44GHz and running stable at 42 C

Its runs pretty quiet to.
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by:buckeyes33
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That is a nice overclock.
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by:Griffon1426
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I recently got a P4 3.00 GHz system and even after it was running for 2 weeks straight, my CPU temperature never got above 40 C.  I am convinced its because of my case and heatsink.  I have a Thermaltake Xaser III Super Tower which comes with 7 fans surrounding the case and it keeps the inside really cool.  The case also does a good job of keeping all the fans pretty quiet.  In addition I got an excellent CPU heatsink and fan which I believe it also made my Cooler Master...it looks like a jet engine and is rated to accomodate up to 3.6 GHz.  It also has an external control to adjust the fan speed which also helps the noise.  Overall they work very well to keep my system cool.
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by:roadhog_NZ
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Ahh, sounds nice, I think theres definatley one thing to say, money spent on a good case and cooling is not wasted.
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by:gbentley
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Thanks again for all the responses. I am now fairly happy with my system after a few mods.

1. Cut the grills out from in front of the fans. This alone pretty much solved the heat problem.
2. Made a duct that covers the top of the CPU fan (inlet side), and leads to the top of the case adjacent to some vents. This dropped the CPU fan speed from 5,900 RPM to 3,500 rpm! This has quietened it down a bit.
3. Made another duct to lead hot air from the Video card to one of the front fans. This dropped the Motherboard temp a few more degrees.
4. Added soft rubber gaskets to PSU and all fans. This has dropped the noise somewhat.

The MOBO temp is now rock solid at around 2 degrees over ambient and doesn't move regardless of system load. The CPU sits on around 37 C an peaks at 50 C during a 3DMark run.

The strangest thing I've noticed is that the MOBO temp goes up about 3 degrees when the sides are taken off, and the CPU drops about 2 degrees. My interpretation is that the cooling of the MOBO is perfect with the sides on, but the CPU is still sucking warm air from somewhere. Might have to revisit that duct.
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by:gbentley
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Well the saga continues.

Decided to do some tests to see which fans were really helping and which weren't. Also to work out what is producing the most noise. So, I disconnected all three case fans, and found a big drop in noise, but the temp was a bit high. Tried the rear fan, and found this was cooling effectively on it's own, but was also very noisy.

Then tried the 2 front fans, and found it didn't actually have much effect on temps, it was still too hot. But, these two were quieter than the one at the back. so, thinks I, I'll swap one of the front fans to the rear replacing the loud one. So far so good.

I then started looking at the air flow and focused on the cables hanging in the case, PSU and disk cables. These take up a bit of space, and affect the airflow particularly around the RAM socckets. So, I removed all cable ties and the like, and spread the PSU cable out to see what went where. After some re-routing of the cables along the edges of the case, they were virtually invisible, and no longer blocking air.

The next victims were the CD and Floppy cables which are of the flat type. Ithought of replacing them with the new "rounded" versions that are available, but after a bit of thought, realised I could route them completely out of the way of any airflow. Did that, and the case now looks empty without all those wires!

At this point things were looking good, but having removed the CPU duct mentioned above, the CPU fan was running flat out again and now made most of the noise. So I rebuilt the duct from the top of the CPU to the case vents. This time I also extended the cover on top of the CPU down the sides (not the heatsink outlet sides!) and secured it. The CPU fan then dropped back to its 3300 rpm level at which the noise is acceptable.

The box is now working as desired.

So, what made the biggest difference?

Sorting out the cables had a significant effect on reducing the MOBO temp by allowing good airflow.

Removing the "grill" from in front of the rear fan made it a lot more effective.

Adding the duct stopped the "circulating air" problem and so it now works efficiently.

I just wish PC box makers would spend the 10 minutes it takes to route all the cables neatly as it makes such a diference. Wonder how many PCs there are out there with this kind of problem?

If any one has any queries, please post. I'll leave this for another few days, then award the points somewhere. Hopefully someone else will find this saga useful.

Regards
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by:buckeyes33
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>>Wonder how many PCs there are out there with this kind of problem?
a lot more than i would want to deal with.  Mine is neat as neat can get.  


Looks like you have done a good job at fixing your problem.
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by:roadhog_NZ
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Theres lots of cases out there now with side openings for cpu cooling, my fear... especially when supplying to a family with kids is that someone would jam a pencil or something in there and stop the cpu fan altogether
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by:gbentley
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Thats one reason I didn't take the duct for the CPU directly to the side of the case but up to the top behind the PSU adjacent to a grill type vent. Even if they do stick something in there, all they hit is cardboard. I also didn't want to cut a hole in my lovely brushed alloy case!

I suspect that even just having a kind of chimney going toward the case side, but not touching to allow air to get in, would be almost as effective. When I was trying all these options, just putting a cylinder about 50 mm tall over the top of the CPU dropped the fan speed dramatically.

The real issue seems to be the air just circulating through the fan and heatsink over and over. As soon as you stop this happening, the cooling works much better.
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by:gbentley
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Thanks again to all who contributed.

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