Cloned W2000 Drive: Login attempt = loop, No apparent escape

Hi,
I recently started getting the dreaded "bad sector/block" report from my W2000 logs so I decided to upgrade to a new drive. Since I'm a multimedia developer, I have a lot of software on my computer that would take days to reinstall and configure. I'm in the middle of two development projects so I don't have the time to commit to a clean install. I decided to clone my existing 10 Gig, Maxtor, C: (Windows 2000) drive and it's F: (applications) drive partition to a new 80 Gig, Seagate, disk. I purchased Acronis True Image 7.0 to accomplish this task.

I installed the new 80 Gig drive as a slave and followed the True Image 7 directions for cloning my HD. After the cloning process completed, without a hitch, I connected the new drive as the master and the old drive as slave. When I rebooted the computer it still recognized the OLD 10 Gig drive as the C: drive... I went into the Computer management console and changed the drive letter assignments to the following:

New Seagate 80 Gig drive - 2 partitions
partition 1 (Windows OS) - C:
partition 2 (Applications) - F:

Old Maxtor 10 Gig drive
partition 1 (Windows OS) - M: (Previously C:)
partition 2 (Applications) - N: (Previously F:)

After designating the new drive letter assignments my plan was to restart the computer, wait for successful boot and then zero fill, erase and repartition the old 10 Gig drive for storage. Unfortunately, nothing went as planned. When I restarted the computer it repeats a login loop, I can't log in. I decided to try the Seagate boot utillity, the disk that came with the new drive, to access troubleshooting tools but it the prog freezes, upon booting from CDROM, and sometimes shuts the computer down spontaneously.

Is this a common problem?
Why didn't this procedure work?
The seagate tools disk worked fine previously, now it doesn't, why?
Is there a work around or solution to the W2000 login loop?
Is this a hardware issue?
Thanks,
Mobius
MobiusStripAsked:
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MobiusStripAuthor Commented:
Thanks, Yarno and Diggisaur, for your input, I appreciate it. The articles you pointed to were of help in diagnosing the problem. My final solution, more within my realm of experience, came from a post I found on another forum:

BEGIN POST
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http://forums.winxpcentral.com/showthread.php?t=1018

I have seen that problem a lot with Cloned Win2k partitions. I don't know if this will help you, but I ran into the same error when cloning my harddrive to a new one. (pagefile.sys missing or too small)
Here is the solution I came up with:
You will need a Win98 boot disk, and a Win2k CD.
After the paritition is cloned, reboot
if it doesn't boot into Windows at all, then reboot with the Win2k CD and go to repair, and do a fixboot.
It should then boot.
Shutdown and unplug the disk you don't want to use.
Startup and be sure the bios is set to the harddrive you want to boot with.
Restart the computer with the Win98 boot floppy.
type FDISK.
If the harddrive is large, or in NTFS, the size will be reported incorrectly, but it doesn't matter.
Be sure it is marked as active. If not, set it as the active partition.
Exit FDISK back to the prompt
Type fdisk /mbr and press enter
Now restart the computer and it should boot into Win2k and allow you to log in.
it will ask to restart after you log because of the settings that changed.
Restart it and make sure everything works ok. Then shutdown and reconnect the other drive.
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Post-procedure everything seemed all well and good. Afterward, I downloaded what Windows update claimed was the "latest driver" for my D-Link hardware and now I have lost all network capabillities including internet and the abillity to log into my router... I even tried reinstalling the old drivers to no avail. Ah, the wonder and beauty of computers: Another day another troubleshooting procedure. These days it seems my machine is completely falling apart after several years of rock solid stabillity. How unnerving and at such an inoportune moment! If anyone can shed some light on this new problem I would be eternally grateful.
Thanks,
Mobius
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