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Problems with Windows 2003 & 2000 running in the same Domain!?

Posted on 2004-03-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
Are there any known problems having Windows 2000 & 2003 server machines running in the same domain?
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Question by:timan72
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Expert Comment

by:dan_blagut
ID: 10656789
No problems... but be carefoul at domain functional level if the DC are mixed.
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Expert Comment

by:Ugrum
ID: 10656908
There are some issues, but they will most likely not affect your services or available functionality, but rather affect the way you configure administer the domain and its services. One good example is single-label domain names. By default Windows 2003 (as well as Windows 2000 SP4 though) will not attempt to register or update any dns records located in a single-label domain zone, e.g. "local". Effectively, this may result in incorrect service record registration for newly installed domain controllers with W2k3. Windows 2000 prior to SP4 will do, however. Windows 2003 and W2k SP4 will need some additional configuration to make them able update records in single-label domains.

Single-label domain name issue is the one I see most often; for more details see KB300684, Information About Configuring Windows 2000 for Domains With Single-Label DNS Names
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Author Comment

by:timan72
ID: 10657044
To be more precise: Are there ANY problems known when Win 2000 Domain-Controllers and Win2003 Domain-Controllers are both present for the same domain? Is this recommended? Is this common practice?
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Ugrum earned 2000 total points
ID: 10657139
There are SOME problems known which actually become problems under certain circumstances, and all of them have a workaround. I just gave an example. I can give you another one - in Windows 2000 Domain, Cert Publishers group is created as a Global. In Windows 2003, it is created as Domain Local. This definitely affects the way you can use this group when delegating permissions on other domains (remember that if you have a CA, the CA needs to publish certificates in AD, and that includes other domains as well).
I haven't encountered a problem which didn't have a workaround or caused serious functionality drawbacks. Using both W2k and W2k3 DCs is a common practice and widely applied for upgrade scenarios.
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