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Does Visual Basic have an array size limit?

Posted on 2004-03-23
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
I am using VB6 on Windows XP. I have some arrays that are 7 by 6 million. I found through experimentation that increasing my RAM from 512M to 1G allowed me to get an array of 6 million. If I increase my RAM some more, can I increase my array size or does VB put some numerical limit on the size of an array?

thanks!

jeff
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Question by:jscharpf
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:bobbit31
ID: 10659502
Not certain... but it seems like it's 64K (so it would depend on what you are storing in the array:

see here:

http://www.nsbasic.com/palm/info/technotes/TN08.htm
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by:bobbit31
ID: 10659565
HOWEVER, i just tried it... and i did an array of 50000 strings whiich is well over the constraints the above link mentions. I know in c/c++ array size is theorhetically limited by amount of stack space. I'll do some more research
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Accepted Solution

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bobbit31 earned 50 total points
ID: 10659643
after further research, i couldn't find anything in MSDN nor google. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say the max size of the array is dependant on the amount of memory you have available.
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Author Comment

by:jscharpf
ID: 10659646
So far I've done 6 million single precision numbers..
I was at 4 million until I upgraded my RAm..
This is why I ask what the limit is. 64 thousand is definitely not correct.

Jeff
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Expert Comment

by:_ys_
ID: 10661243
Given that the LBound / UBound pair can return Long values, we potentially have a very big array.
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Author Comment

by:jscharpf
ID: 10661333
I guess I have to accept that :)
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by:j_chakraverty
ID: 10672100
Hi seems an answer is accepted but i'd like to leave a few comments

[1]
all platforms and programming language has a theoratical uppel limit to every aspect of it. and a practicle upper limit too which is mostly lower than the
whatever it is it is certainly a power of (2^n)-1
[2]
VB or any programming language will not put any upper limit ( unless it is a workaround for some bug in compiler or interpreter) such upper limits are OS governed

[3]
When we test arrays we do so with a code that does nothing else in practicle thats rarly the case.

[4]
with array the ram usage increases exponantially. I do not remember the source but i do remember reading it in a book




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