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How to start a program from another program ?

I am using C++ in Linux.

Simple: I have a program that prints HELLO in the screen. Now, this program should call another program, let us say a program that in a new window will say THANK YOU FOR HELPING.

I know you can open files and write to files from a program, but I want now to start another simple program from the first program.

Thank you, and if you need more details, et me know it.
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probine
Asked:
probine
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1 Solution
 
leflonCommented:
Hi probine,

depends a bit on the environment aou are in, but you can use

int system( const char *command );

to start another prog from your app.
if you can give us your env. we can give you other possibilities

hth
leflon
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Sys_ProgCommented:
If u have the executable of the second file
Then u could use
system ( execuatble path of second file ) ;

However, I doubt if this would give u the second file output in a new window
It would give the output in the same output widow as that of first

Amit
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Sys_ProgCommented:
Sorry  leflon,

I guess we started the same time

Amit
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probineAuthor Commented:
This is what I have:

1. A program called main.cpp
2. A program called test.cpp


This is what I have in main:
*************************
include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   cout <<"Hello";
   // I want to execute the program test.cpp here
}

This is what I have in test.cpp
***************************
include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   cout <<"THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP";
}


Do I have to incude some header file or something ?
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leflonCommented:
@Amit: yepp happens to me all the time :-)


oops somehow overread the first line  >> I am using C++ in Linux

leflon
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leflonCommented:
probine,

you compile both files and will get two exe files (say main.exe and test.exe, or main and test, or whatever your compiler settings are).

to use system you have to include stdlib.h in the file where you will use the system() call.

#include<iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   cout <<"Hello";
   system("test.exe"); // if both exe's are in the same path, else provide complete path to test.exe
   // I want to execute the program test.cpp here
}



leflon
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probineAuthor Commented:
Great help and easy to understand... thank you leflon and SYS prog.

You both gave me a good answer... Can I split the points ?
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probineAuthor Commented:
Perhaps you can help me with this:

I need to print HELLO in the screen every 10 seconds.

What class do I include and how is the code ?
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leflonCommented:
probine,

do you have to print a certain number of times or till a key is pressed?

you can use time_t (seconds since 1.1.1970) and the according time functions (include <time.h>).

time_t tNow;
time(&tNow);  // getsystem time in seconds now
int ix = 0;
while(ix<10)
{
    cout << "Hello";
    while((tNow+10)>time(NULL))  // loop till actual system time is 10 seconds greater than tNow
    {
// use either
        sleep(1);       //stops thread for 1 second, check your man pages for header needed for this
// or
        usleep(1000);   //stops thread for 1000 microsecond, check your man pages for header needed for this
// you can omit the sleeps, but then the prog will use 100% of the system for the whole time it runs, which is not very good
    }
    time(&tNow);
}

leflon
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