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I found this in my /etc/system file: set rlim_fd_max=2048 Can you provide details on this setting?

This seems to be a file discriptor setting.  Is it an OK setting and how does it affect my overall performance?
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Hi rwpulliam,
That changes the maximum number of file descriptors per process to 2048. It's a kernel setting - so be careful.

The number of fd's increase the amount of memory each process needs. Some applications require a higher than defaul value here - but don't change anything here unless you need to and you know what you're doing.


gives an explanation of rlim_fd_max and rlim_fd_cur

It is the "Hard" limit of file descriptors and by default is 1024
I seem to remember increasing it on a very, very busy webserver

What application are you running?
rwpulliamAuthor Commented:
I am running several rsync processes on one staging serverto keep web content syncronized on 4 production servers. This has caused /tmp to go to 100% on one of the target production servers.  At any given time there may be several instances of rsync running.  I am hoping using this setting  on all servers involved in the syncronization process will prevent this (/tmp at 100%) from happening.  I noticed this kernel setting on a database server in our enterprise that is running very smoothly.

Keep me posted.

/tmp overflows cannot be prevented by increasing the number of file descriptors. You should rather use the
 -T, --temp-dir=DIR

option of rsync to point to another directory than /tmp.
> I noticed this kernel setting on a database server in our enterprise
> that is running very smoothly

A DB server is a lot different from a web repository server. It's like watching someone win a race in a yellow car and then repainting your car yellow expecting to win :-)
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