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Switch/Hub general question

Posted on 2004-03-24
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
Hi there, just a quick stupid question here...

I'm designing a network as part of my course, and its only got to have very basic details in it. One of the LANs on the network will only have one pc on it (its an off license with a single PC, I want it to be able to connect to the other LANS on the WAN).

So the LAN with only 1 PC, does it need a hub or a switch? And if not, what does it need other than the usual router and firewall etc?

Thanks in advance!!!
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Question by:tigermoth
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kabaam earned 200 total points
ID: 10671440
First answer a couple questions for me:
What is the difference between a WAN and a LAN?  
what is the difference between a hub and a switch?  Compare that with the network requirements: neither will help with wan access
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Author Comment

by:tigermoth
ID: 10671619
now your making me remember some stuff from a while ago...

a switch breaks up a LAN's collision domain, preventing collisions in the LAN; a hub doesn't break up the collision domain but does enable a number of computers (typically 8,12 or 24??) to access a LAN. Switches also allow a number of computers to connect to the LAN, so it could be argued that hubs are not needed. (although they are typically cheaper than switches so can be useful when u have a large amount of pc's on one lan).

A LAN is typically a small network of computers residing within one building or office, whilst a WAN is a network enabling a number of LANs to communicate to each other, usually across a large distance.

so what would I need for a single PC at a single site to connect to the WAN, enabling it to connect to other LANs across the whole network?
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Expert Comment

by:JohnK813
ID: 10671651
Hubs and switches are just used to split a connection (presumably from the router).

If your router has access to the WAN (and, eventually, the other LANs), you should just be able to plug that single PC directly into the router.
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Expert Comment

by:kabaam
ID: 10671719
if you only have one computer on that 'LAN'. What would the hub and switch be 'breaking up'?

router-------hub/switch--------computer

router----------computer
is all you should need.

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Expert Comment

by:kabaam
ID: 10671738
now, what type of WAN connection are you using?  Is this one computer dialing directly to the other side? Is it using the internet to access the other side?

You need to look at that before looking at equipment required to do the job.
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Expert Comment

by:dcrysler
ID: 10679868
For the LAN with one pc you'll need neither a hub nor a switch, you can plug your pc directly into the router using a cross-over cable.  
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