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PRIMARY DOMAIN SERVER - changing network card effects on exchange

Posted on 2004-03-24
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hi,

We have a nice win2k server running as our primary domain - talking to a unix dns, linux gateway.
This server hosts our exchange configuration plus a multitude of applications etc etc.

I'm planning to take it down and replace the current network card with a gig one - should be nice an fast.
I will take a copy of all the static ip address's, dns etc etc off the current.  I'll set the ip address's of the new card to match.

My question is, what are the ramifications on other parts of the system of doing this?  Are there likely to be any problems with exchange that will last through the reboot and install of new card etc?

This is a pretty simple task, but i'm a little nervous about the repercussions.  I know that replacing a network card on a unix system is quite involved and can cause major problems.

Any tips appreciated.
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Question by:benspan
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by:mrpez1
ID: 10673196
Instead of replacing it, install the new one as an additional network card. That way if you have any problems you can just switch the cat5 back. Otherwise, I wouldn't forsee any major problems. Should be straight forward.
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JammyPak earned 50 total points
ID: 10678475
as long as the address is the same, there shouldn't be any issues here (nothing is tied to the MAC address in exchange or active directory....)
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 10678897
Actually MS doesn't support Domain Controllers with more than one NIC on them.  I know plenty of people run DCs with more than one nic but it isn't supported since replication and so on doesn't know which nic it needs to use.  But simply replacing the nic with the same IP address and mask shouldn't be a problem... but i wouldn't run 2 nics at once on a DC
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by:mrpez1
ID: 10679528
My dell Poweredge 2600 came with two. I run one and have no problems at all.

Here's a microsoft article on server hardware. Thier configs have dual nics:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/msa/edc/all/solution/en-us/rak/rag/edcrag03.mspx

"Network Interface Card: Two 10/100 Fast Ethernet adapters supporting PXE (Pre-boot Execution Environment)"

or

"Network Interface Card: Two 10/100/1000 Fast Ethernet (Gigabit supported) adapters supporting PXE, Network Interface Card teaming"



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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 10679798
Yes most poweredge servers do come with 2 nics,,, i have 13 that do,, but if you read that article is says nothing about these servers being domain controllers.  Physically having 2 nics and having 2 nics enabled and actually connected to the network are 2 different things,,,Its still best for DCs to only have one nic that is used,, it doesn't matter if the server physically has more than one though.

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by:mrpez1
ID: 10679888
Take another look:

Server Class Two
Class Two servers have more memory than Class One servers and also have additional storage configuration options. More fault tolerance and storage bays are available for services that need a large number of spindles with locally attached storage.

• Processor: 2 processors, speeds vary from 700 MHz to 1.6 GHz
 
• Memory: 2 GB
 
• Locally attached storage

• Drive controller: Range from a single channel wide ultra2 SCSI to four channel SCSI 3 RAID 0, 5 and 0+1 capable
 
• Hard Drives: Range from 18 GB to 72.8 GB. 10K-15K RPM
 
• Hard Drive bays: Up to 12
 
 
• Network Interface Card: Two 10/100/1000 Fast Ethernet (Gigabit supported) adapters supporting PXE, Network Interface Card teaming
 

Class Two servers support the following service roles within the MSA EDC architecture:

• ************** Internal domain controllers ***************
 
• Microsoft SQL Server management server with DBCC service
 
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 10679973
INTERNAL domain controller is key here,,, meaning it only has ONE nic,, not an internal nic and and external nic. B/C if it did have an internal nic and an external nic the DC woudn't know which one to send replication info out of. Internal in this case means LAN nic,,, external means a public nic.
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by:mrpez1
ID: 10680026
Read two lines up. The machine has two nics teaming. Who said anything about setting up a nic for an external public ip? Anyways, I think the original question has been answered.
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 10680137
FYI "NIC teaming" means one 2 physcal nics acting as one logical nic.   MS only supports one "logical" nic on a DC just like i said in the first place. In this case as far as the OS is concerned the server only has one 1 NIC which is all that is supported.... looks like we disagreed on what the definition of a nic is,, physcal nic or logical nic.
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by:mrpez1
ID: 10680353
Getting back to the original question, I suggested that benspan add a second nic and then switch the cat 5 to it to be used as the single logical and physical NIC. If there were any problems he could switch back to the known good nic. He would not be adding an external address to either card nor would he be multihoming his DC. As Dell ships DCs with two adapters and microsoft recommends two nics, I see no problem with this solution.
If you disagree, show me where microsoft says this shouldn't be done.
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Expert Comment

by:mikeleebrla
ID: 10680395
it says it the article you referenced here,, 2 nics that are "teamed" are only seen as ONE nic to the OS.
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by:JammyPak
ID: 10680488
Multi-homed master browsers screws up browsing:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;191611

LDAP problems on multi-homed DCs with >51 addresses (!!)
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;258811
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by:mrpez1
ID: 10680648
"...nor would he be multihoming his DC."
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