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accessing windows system drivers fom linux system

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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
how to access a windows disk drivers over network from a Linux system. the same how to access Linux file system over network from windows system on the same LAN.  for example to access a windows system from wondows system u can just type \\hostname\DriverLetter$
at the execute command.
 how this can bez done
fom windows system to Linux system;
from linux system to windows system.
thanks



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Top Expert 2005

Commented:
To access a shared folder that resides on a windows box from Linux you mount the share with something like:

mount -t smbfs -o username=win-use,password=win-pass,uid=lin-user //hostname/share /mount-point

The mount command ordinarily must be executed by root and windows doesn't understand the concept of file ownsership like Linux does, so specifying the uid in the mount command allows the specified linux user read/write access to the mounted share.

For access from windows to Linux files you need Samba running on the Linux box and configured to share out the data that you want the windows systems to be able to see.
The code posted previously will work for you but I usually just keep mine a lil more simpler...

mount -t smbfs -o username=user01,password=password01 //host/sharename /hard/mount/point/label

I also set up a user specifically for Samba which keeps my logs straight because I know that only that user should be accessing shares and that the samba user should not be logging in any other places.  Makes for an easy way to sort your log entries.  I also syncronize my windows and linux users so that they are the same across the board.  I'm not sure of the exact syntax to do this because I just use webmin on it...but it has to do with the samba PAM module (pam_smbpass).  You should be able to man that as well.  

Overall, it depends on how much security you want.  Remember that if you want samba passwords encrypted that it is a whole other bag of nuts.  Hope everything goes well for you.

Commented:
i'd rather not use samba anymore nowodays, since microsoft gives it's SFU away for free.
you now can use straight NFS, instead of SMB / CIB fs. better integration , better performances..
give it a try !
won't work for me, I use XP Home :(

Author

Commented:
the line given by TheKeyboardslayer and jlevie worked perfectly from Linux host to windows system.

now, can u please details what can be done to access a Linux system from windows system?


thanks




Top Expert 2005

Commented:
You need Samba installed, configured, and running. A farily simple Samba config might look like:

[global]
  workgroup = SHAMAN
  server string = Samba Server
  printcap name = /etc/printcap
  load printers = yes
  log file = /var/log/samba/%m.log
  max log size = 50
  security = user
  encrypt passwords = yes
  socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192

[homes]
  comment = Home Directories
  browseable = no
  writable = yes
  create mode = 0644
  directory mode = 0755

[printers]
  comment = All Printers
  path = /var/spool/samba
  browseable = no
# Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print
  guest ok = no
  writable = no
  printable = yes

Which will allow access to a user's home directory. Other shares can be defined as needed. Each Linux user must have a Samba account created with 'smbpasswd -a linux-user-name'. And that is the username that must be used from a windows box.
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