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Password Hacking question

skbohler
skbohler asked
on
Medium Priority
4,628 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-11
Hello,

Early this morning, someone(s) gained unauthorized entry into our web application using valid login information.

We're trying to determine how they got the login information.

Are there any applications which hackers can use which will make repeated login attempts to an application's login page?
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Security Samurai
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Top Expert 2006
Commented:
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webcracker is the most popular
http://www.securityfocus.com/tools/706
http://www.packetstormsecurity.org/Crackers/indexdate.shtml
Here there are many tools which could help you out.

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the initial responses.

Wouldn't the initial invalid attempts show up in both our IIS log files as hits to the login page?

-Steve

Author

Commented:
It looks like your responses are addressing attempts to hack into a server, not an application with an HTML login page. No?

-Steve
Rich RumbleSecurity Samurai
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Top Expert 2006

Commented:
They should- log such things. Like I said, many many ways to get a legit username and password. If they do scan your your server, and find it exploitable- then it's very likely this was their way in- then the gathered a few usernames and passwords... perhaps.
What has been listed are some tools that can look for expolits for your application (gfi nessus) and nessus also has a brute force capability. Social engineering is a fabulous way to get such information. With-out better forensic's there is no real way to tell how this info was obtained... too many variables at work here.
Hacking a person's computer- that uses your site, could contain a cached logon cred..
they could of worked for you previously, or they have someone on the inside... perhaps your application was written out-of-house, and a devloper used and account or back door to get in.. your imagination is the limit...
-rich

Author

Commented:
Since the log file shows only one attempt before gaining access through a valid login, it seems that they weren't using any software which keeps trying different things.

Other than learning of login information from a person, piece of paper, etc., are there other ways of obtaining login information? Can they "tap into" communication over the internet and filter out usernames and password strings?

Thanks again,
Steve
Rich RumbleSecurity Samurai
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Top Expert 2006

Commented:
Not typically, they can't sniff the wire... they can get into a server with an exploit to IIS or Apache, even you app may reveal what it's looking for. Once you've gained access to a server (from being unpatched, or exploited), you can look around for valid usernames and passes in SQL or what ever data-base (the windows SAM) they may be stored in. In order to sniff (tap into) they need to be on the same subnet, and or in the same broadcast domain. You can sniff traffic while it's in transit to different places, if an employee of an ISP were to sniff his own traffic, he could easily gain such information if he/she were a "hop" that the info passed through. If you do a tracert to microsoft.com you "hop" through quite a few routers on different isp's and service providers, any one of those points (hops), any where in the world, could in theory "sniff" a communication such as username and password.

Encrypted communications are the best ways of thwarting such "sniffing". Https (http secure) SSL are the best ways to prevent this from happening-easily. Again, there are trojan's that install keyloggers, as well as URL monitoring- both with timestamps, so that the key strokes can be associated or  with a particular log-in to a url. This get's around the https solution. The possibilities are truly endless. For each cure or fix, there are other ways of obtaining the info.
So a user infected with a trojan, could unwittingly be giving a hacker this information, there is no real way to track down what has happened to you- again too many variables...
Your not Paranoid if everyone is really out to get you :) If you don't have a firewall, your asking to be hacked, if you don't run AV your bound to get infected (with M$ that is)

-rich

Author

Commented:
Thanks for your reply.

The username they used wasn't stored on our web server. Our SQL server database is on another database (on a shared server). Unfortunately I have no way of telling if they hacked into that.

We do have a firewall and have shut off their IP address for now.

Thanks!
anyhow I do not agree on your decision as richrumble proposed portscanners not tools that make web logins
sadly that you took that as a good answer!
Rich RumbleSecurity Samurai
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Top Expert 2006

Commented:
Nessus indeed can make web login's- GFI can check for easy passwords if configured correctly. I think the split was fair, there are again too many variables to know for certain. Thanks.
-rich
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