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No SCSCI Boot Device Found

Posted on 2004-03-25
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Last Modified: 2008-02-26
We put in a SCSI card into one of our computers with a SCSI harddrive.  When we boot, we get the following errors:

"No SCSI boot device found" & "No BIOS Installed"

We're lost as to what to try next.  Here's our specs:

The SCSI card manufacturer is Adaptec, and the model # on the card is: AHA-2940UW.   The PC is Dell, Pentium II, 400MHZ.  It is a Power Edge 1300.  The hard drive is a SCSI IBM, DNES-318350W.

THANKS!!
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Question by:RenitlahHelp
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 10678334
Can you get into the Adaptec SCSI BIOS (ctrl-A?) and see if the boot option is enabled?
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Author Comment

by:RenitlahHelp
ID: 10679072
We just purchased Windows 2003 Server.  Would this solve the issue and CTRL+A does not work.
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 10679144
No, this is a hardware configuration issue.  Ctrl-A is normally used to get into Adaptec controllers, so when you boot up, do you see a message saying "hit <some-key> to get into setup"?
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Accepted Solution

by:
rid earned 250 total points
ID: 10679173
You need to get the specs on the SCSI host adapter from Adaptec. Some host adapters allow for disabling the on-board BIOS, in which case there will be boot problems. You might want to check that.

Also, the ID's of the SCSI device(s) is involved here. The best approach is to set ID 0 for the boot drive and make sure there are no ID duplicates.

No operating system will work properly if the boot device isn't defined.

/RID
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Author Comment

by:RenitlahHelp
ID: 10679349
Ok - let me dig into what this tech has truly tried and get back to you.  THanks for all the great input.
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Author Comment

by:RenitlahHelp
ID: 10679490
We do get that prompt to configure the SCSI adapters.  The hard drive is
SCSI with the address set to 0 (the boot address).  And the two SCSI
cards we had in there we pulled out.  The machine actually boots up fine
-- the OS loads and goes into the Windows startup screen.  If we had
conflicting SCSI addresses or had one of the cards set to a 0 address,
it would have stopped there, but it isn't until it loads something in
the Windows OS that it crashes.  And the tech was able to bring it up in safe
mode, so it's highly possible that when we had both cards in there it
tried to do something that made it go screwy, and now every time we boot
it back up it tries to do that again.  
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Assisted Solution

by:Callandor
Callandor earned 250 total points
ID: 10679585
Ok, if you got it to boot, then the next step is the drivers.  When the OS was installed, did the installer press F6 at the appropriate time to install the SCSI drivers?
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Author Comment

by:RenitlahHelp
ID: 10680701
They gave up...Anyway, thanks for the input everyone!!  How do I split points?
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Expert Comment

by:rid
ID: 10680758
Splitting should be an option a bit down the page. otherwise you could ask for a refund by posting a Q in the Community Support area.
/RID
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