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BT Broadband keeps disconnecting

My BT Broadband keeps disconnecting.

I have a top of the range PC, running XP Home and using an AccessRunner ADSL card.

is it just BT or is it me?

I have not changed anything and it seems to be getting more and more frequent.


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messenger
Asked:
messenger
1 Solution
 
Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
BT Broadband..  ??  Could you expand on this..??

If it is ADSL, then you may want to ck your MTU settings..  Cable uses an MTU size of 1500, but DSL needs a little less since they add a packet header..  1492 is what you would need for this..

Here is a little more explanation, and how to:  (Copied from a previous post..)

ADSL Packet Loss and MTU Size

Sounds suspiciously like packet loss.  This sometimes happens with a ADSL Router (especially if you are using PPPoE).  Your system is probably set for an MTU size of 1500, whereas it might need to be set to 1492.  

This is the fix for WXP.  But it should also work in W2K.  Let me know.

FE

Modify the MTU Size
WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

To modify the PPPoE MTU size, locate the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Ndiswan\Parameters\Protocols\0

and add the following registry values:
Value name: ProtocolType
Data Type: REG_DWORD
Value Data: 0x00000800

Value name: PPPProtocolType
Data Type: REG_DWORD
Value Data: 0x00000021

Value name: ProtocolMTU
Data Type: REG_DWORD
Value Data: the appropriate MTU size (in decimal)

To do so:
Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
Locate and then click the following key in the registry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Ndiswan\Parameters

On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click Key.
Type Protocols, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click Key.
Type 0, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
Type ProtocolType, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, click Modify.
Type 800, and then click OK.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
Type PPPProtocolType, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, click Modify.
Type 21, and then click OK.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
Type ProtocolMTU, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, click Modify.
Type the appropriate MTU size (decimal value), and then click OK.
Quit Registry Editor.
Notes
As a result, if the MTU size is set to 1460 (decimal), the max value of NUM in the following command line can be 1432:
ping IP_address -f -l NUM

You may need to restart the computer to make the change take effect.
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
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ladyhawk-utahCommented:
If none of the above work, check interference.

The dsl modems usually run at 900 mhz and are affected by other frequency devices. The following should be checked for by removing the possible interference all at once, running the dsl modem connection, and then begin adding items back on - one at a time.

MSNBB: How to Check for Interfering Line Devices(non-public database)

SUMMARY
This article describes how to check for and reduce interference on DSL lines. DSL operates by sharing the existing telephone line copper wiring with the telephone service. In this shared environment, any device using the telephone line has the potential to interfere with the DSL connection. The most common interfering devices are:  
 
-  Telephones: cordless phones that are 2.4/5 ghz can be on the same phone line but not on the same phone/dsl cable as the modem; 900 mhz cordless phones should not be in the same room, sometimes not used at all (dsl modems run at 900 mhz); all phones need to be filtered
-  Answering machines - should be filtered and not on the same cable as the modem
-  Separate Caller ID boxes - should be filtered and not on the same cable as the modem
-  Fax machines - should be filtered and not on the same cable as the modem
-  Dial-up modems - when using for faxing, etc., remove the dsl/phone cable from the modem; the dial up modem can hang up the dsl modem
-  Alarm systems - must be filtered before being attached to the phone line (alarm company is responsible)
-  Digital Cable and TV programming systems, such as TiVO; must be filtered before plugging into the phone line OR just leave unplugged when not using - dsl modem dsl/phone cable unplugged when using systems
-  Digital water or gas meters that transmit data over the phone line - must be filtered
-  Surge suppressors connected to the telephone cable - remove if it cannot be filtered
-  Unfiltered splitters - filter them
 
MSNBBTS: How to Check for Interfering External Devices(non-public database)

SUMMARY
This article describes how to check for and reduce external interference on DSL lines. External interference is caused by devices that generate frequencies used by the DSL line. DSL operates over a series of channels similar to AM/FM radio signals. These channels run between 4 kHz and 1.1 MHz. Any device that emits a frequency in this DSL range can cause interference. The most common interfering devices include:   Cordless phones
 
-  Sprinkler systems - inside (filter if connected to phone line); outside (if phone lines are above ground, no problem; if buried, have phone company mark where they are buried and turn sprinkler system on to determine if it's flooding over the area where the wires are buried)
-  Radio, TV or cell phone towers within a 1 1/2 mile radius - nothing you can do here, except go back to your cable, which is unaffected for frequency
-  Halogen lamps - remove from same room as modem
-  AM radios - remove from same room as modem
-  Twisted cables (where phone cables from the modem are twisted with other wires such as power cables, printer cables, or powered cabling) - leave hanging free
-  Cable additions - use only the cables provided with the dsl modem; for MSN provided modems the length is 6 feet; adding connectors, extra cable, splitters, etc. can actually disconnect you
-  Ham radio operators - nothing you can do about this either
-  Other radio frequency devices
 
pat
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Hey Pat..  Nice list..!!

FE
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messengerAuthor Commented:
ok, will take a look and get back to yous
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ladyhawk-utahCommented:
Fatal Exception:

Thanks, but not my list. It's straight from Microsoft's private database for broadband and MSN tech support. <smile>

pat
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
private database, eh..??  figures...  hehe
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ladyhawk-utahCommented:
Only as long as I continue to work for MSN. Then, it's gone. <smile>

pat
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Ahh..  as long as we know it is there, we can get to it eh..??   <just kidding..!!>
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ladyhawk-utahCommented:
Can't get to it; however, if you have a question pertaining to MSN broadband, MSN software, MSN messenger, .net passport - some on IE and Hotmail, I can look it up. <smile>

pat
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Thank u Pat..!
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ladyhawk-utahCommented:
I've copied enough of your answers, I probably owe you a few lookups!

pat
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
:)
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Phill_upsonCommented:
Good old BT eh?  Could be many reasons for this, are you using ADSL or RADSL?  This will depend on your distance from the exchange, ADSL will work up to 3.5km and RADSL is for above that but to a limit of 5.5km.  Is yours an engineer install with a new master socket or a self install with microfilters?  Is it a home or business user service and are there lots of other adsl users in your area?

If you live a long distance from the exchange, the interference gets worse, although the service works you may find it unstable at times.  If you are using microfilters, how many do you have? try removing all other devices from the line and see if that improves things, then try putting the microfilters and phones back in one at a time and see what happens.  If you live in a heavy use area, it could be down to the contention, which is 50:1 for home and 20:1 for business services.  In theory, if 50 people are hammering your 576kbps line (although its 512, you will find the connection is 576 in properties) you are only getting an average 11.52kbps, much slower than a normal modem and could cause disconnection if the modem is timing out.

Another good thing to check is do you have a decent firewall running and all of your security patches up to date?  Try running a virus scan to ensure you have no DoS worms performing naughty functions from your PC.

If all that fails try contacting BT and ask them to check for current and historic alarms on your circuit (give them the adsl circuit number, not your telephone number).  Again, failing this, if your modem was part of a package from your isp, report the problem and threaten to stop paying your subscription until its fixed, if you sourced the modem yourself, try a different modem on the line if possible.  Beyond this, i'd have to say it may be a quality of service issue with BT.  A check on www.adslguide.org.uk may reveal other users with similar complaints for your ISP?  Worth a check
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
This question needs to be closed out, unless you have a reason to leave it open.  If you would, please accept one of the experts comments, or split the points if more than one expert helped you.  If you do not know how to do this, please go here for help:

How do I close a question?
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/help.jsp#hi9

Closing Questions
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/help.jsp#hs5

Thanks,

FE
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