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XP hosed after Red Hat 8 dual-boot install

Posted on 2004-03-25
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have an XP box that I've put a second hard drive into and attempted to install Red Hat 8 (from a Sams 24-hours book). XP was defined as the "default" OS during that part of the setup.

After booting Linux, if I reboot and try to boot to XP, I get a message that Windows did not start successfully (We apologize for the inconvenience...) with options to boot into Safe Mode, Last Known Good Configuration, or Start Windows Normally. Safe mode boots (to the wrong screen resolution), but Last Known and Normal both get me back to the same screen. Selecting restart from Safe Mode also gets me back to the same screen. Power down, wait, and reboot gets me back to the same screen. Only by powering down and then flipping the power switch on the back of the power supply, then selecting Last Known Good Configuration can I get it to boot back into Windows. On reboot I get a message that my display driver was unable to complete a drawing operation, asking to send a report to Microsoft.

This is certainly a disincentive for me to go into Linux.

In XP my screen resolution is set to 1024x768, at 32-bit color. In Linux, it wouldn't let me choose that combination. (I couldn't get the test screen to appear at that setting.) I ended up with 16-bit color and 1280x960 resolution.

Given that I'd like to keep the Windows resolution as it's set and I'm willing to go with the lower resolution running Linux, what do I need to do to get this thing working?

Thanks for your assistance.
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Question by:BarryTice
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by:paullamhkg
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For the XP have you try using the XP install CD and run the rescure to recover your XP, and after that recover your boot manager (GRUB or LILO).
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paullamhkg earned 125 total points
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here is abt the GRUB with XP http://www.geocities.com/epark/linux/grub-w2k-HOWTO.html
and here is some abt LILO http://tldp.org/HOWTO/LILO.html
Also you can thinking of NT boot loader http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+NT-Loader.html

the above give you the idea of the boot manager so after you recover your XP you have to consider the boot manager and re install the boot manager.


for your display have a check here http://www.redhat.com/support/resources/howto/XFree86-upgrade/XFree86-upgrade-2.html and after you know which X display server you need to use try to add the entry in /etc/.X11/XF86Config and try again.
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by:BarryTice
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Thanks for the response, paullamhkg.

Instead I poked through the configuration apps from within the root login and reset my screen resolution to 1024x768 on the Linux side. After that it boots both OSs correctly, as long as I perform a shut-down from Linux instead of a reboot. (Guess I got lucky on that one, because I don't know how to recover my boot manager. I'm new to the world of Linux and still trying to get the hang of this stuff.)

But the effort is appreciated, so you'll get the points anyway.

-- b.r.t.
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