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The name of MS SQL Server

Posted on 2004-03-26
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Last Modified: 2011-10-03
Hi
I'm having a huge discussion with a couple of friends about the name of MS SQL Server.
They pronounce the name "sequel server", while I say more like "es-cue-el server".

I mean that SQL is short for "Structured Query Language", and har nothing to do with "sequel". So I say "Es-Cue-El Server" (sort of).
The others says : "my boss says it and I've heard powerful people in Microsoft saying Sequel Server, so that 's the way it is".

Are there some kind of answer here?

 - Mats Magnem (Norway, Europe)
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Question by:theHollow
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squatex earned 50 total points
ID: 10686746
I would say there is no real right or wrong here. Ive heard peple use both pronuciations ALOT. I personally say "see-quell" but I often have to spell out "SQL" for some people to understand where i'm coming from.
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by:lausz
ID: 10686875
A lot of people referes to MS SQL SERVER as "sequel" or "sequel server"....
And  "es-cu-el" are the initial of "Structured Query Language" - SQL.

You can call as you want , there aren´t rule.


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by:Scott Pletcher
ID: 10687401
I agree.  It's common to pronounce "SQL" as a word, like "sequel", just because it's easier.  Some people instead use the "more formal" letter-by-letter style, "es-cu-el".  Either one is acceptable.
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by:sedmans
ID: 10687799
I believe that the first RDBM system was actaully called Sequel.  People then took ideas from this product and developed Structured Query Language (SQL) as a standard.

I know this doesn't answer the question about pronunciation but I like showing off how much useless information I know :-)

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by:Scott Pletcher
ID: 10687840
I thought the first relational system was IBM's "System R" and that IBM developed SQL syntax/language/idea separate from but to use with System R.  IBM really does do some great R&D.

For example:

http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/
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by:Scott Pletcher
ID: 10687937
Sedmans, that is still *very* close though.

The first name for the *SQL language itself* was indeed SEQUEL, although the DBMS name (the final, non-"beta" name) was "System R", not SEQUEL.
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by:edwardsearch
ID: 10688290
Basically initially it is called as sequel only(that time microsoft and Sybase jointly developed Sequeal Server). Once Microsoft developed separtely it chaned the name. ( I read it from some article/book) sometimes before. But i don't know the link.
- Edward
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by:ChrisFretwell
ID: 10688351
Its an acronym, and you'll probably find a split of people who spell out the acronym each time, and people who pronounce it as if it were a word. Any presentations I've been to hosted by MS, its pronounced 'seequell'. But there is no harm in spelling it out each time. Spelling it does take longer (3 syllables over 2 - and I know I cant spell), which in todays fast paced world, means more people will probably sound it out.

I can remember working from one place where we used cics with cobol and they pronounced "cics" like "kicks". I changed jobs and they called it 'c-i-c-s'. For a while it grated on my nerves because I wasnt used to it, but I worked there long enough that I would use both terms interchangably. (and of course cobol is in itself an acronym for common business oriented language, but I know no one who pronounces it c-o-b-o-l)

The english language is filled with words that use to be acronyms like scuba, snafu, radar, etc. Maybe someday we'll see SQL written in the dictionary with pronunciation as a word.
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by:theHollow
ID: 10701881
Hmmm
Looks like the battle with my friends will never end. I thank you all for your answers :-)

Because I am who I am, I think I will continue using the "es-cu-el"- word. But that's because I am too used to call it by the letter-by-letter name. Besides the fact that I still think it's short for a longer word.

I really enjoyed reading the posted articles above. Lots of good points there.

//theHollow
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