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System monitor for SCO Open Server 5.0.5

Posted on 2004-03-26
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How can I find out what resources are being used by my Unix Box?  I want to see something where I can see what processes are using the processor, memory & disk and to what extent.

Something like the task manager in Windows where each process is listed and you can view the memory usage, processor usage etc...


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Question by:saunaG
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tfewster earned 500 total points
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`ps` can show you CPU & memory usage per process; Check the man page, but a couple of examples would be:
ps -ef   # Show "full" output for all processes
ps -e -o args -o user -o pcpu -o vsz    # Equivalent to the info Windows task manager gives

`sar` can be used to keep track of overall system performance
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by:saunaG
ID: 10705125
thats some good stuff, thanks.
When I posted this my disks were going crazy with activity.  Since there is noting in ps regarding disk activity, is it safe to assume that whatever was making the disks work so hard would probably have a high value for %CPU usage?

When I run the command now, (disks are quiet) no process is over 1%, do you think whatever was writing to disk would be significantly higher?

Cheers!
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by:tfewster
ID: 10707492
Unfortunately there's no easy answer to that - In general you would expect to see a correlation, but a badly designed database query could do huge amounts of  input/output and use very little real CPU;  Or many concurrent users/processes can fill physical memory up so that the system starts swapping processes out to swap (disk), which is very slow.

The first thing to do is to get some baseline figures when the system is running normally;  Have sar running all the time to collect stats every 10 minutes or so; Save the output of ps to a file so you have something to compare against when the system is heavily loaded.  I can't remember if OpenServer has the `top` command - If so, that gives a handy snapshot of system performance.

Work out how your disks are laid out; Conventional wisdom says operating system, applications programs and data should be on seperate physical disks, so you can see from the disk activity where the bottleneck is; Once you know how the system works in real life, you can juggle data locations to spread the load best.

http://docsrv.sco.com:507/en/PERFORM/CONTENTS.html is a detailed performance tuning guide - Read the section on Quick system tuning for some common problems/symptoms and suggestions on resolving them. You may have to buy more memory, disks or faster CPUs to get the performance you want, but the guide will help you get the most out of what you already own.

http://www.sarcheck.com/scosr5.htm claims to monitor & analyse performance and makes tuning recommendations, if you need quick fixes and don't have time to become a SCO guru ;-)
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