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HDD Showing Used Space after partition/format

Posted on 2004-03-27
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
Hi, I have a 80GB hard drive that runs fine, I have tested it and it gives no errors, I even checked it with Partition Magic and windows 2000 and xp, I have deleted the parition and created it again using partition magic 8 and even in windows tryint to solve my problem, but nothing seems to work.

The problem is after I create the partition and format the drive NTFS I have tried also changing cluster sizes, but nothing is helping, anyway after the format it says there is around 65MB of used space on the drive and it says its allocated to system files. I thought at first maybe my OS (windows 2000) was doin it, so I wiped the 40GB Drive C: and also the 80GB deleted partitions on both drives and started fresh, I have the same result in drive d: still saying 65MB used space even when using the partition magic from boot disks in dos mode. Anyone experience or know how to solve this problem? I cannot figure it out and its annoying me since I want the drive for just storage and I am wanting the full capacity. Thnx!
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Question by:dllfile
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by:Sabyre
ID: 10696768
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by:dllfile
ID: 10696850
right, but im not asking why when formatted it is less, I am asking why after I make a clean new partition and format i, it says used space 65MB when ive not put nothing on it yet.
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by:dllfile
ID: 10697133
http://webpages.charter.net/dougp/pics/drive.jpg

here is a screenshot, I deleted the partition of my other computer, installed Windows 2000 then I created a new partition on another hard drive, my 60GB drive, formated it, and now it shows it has 66.2MB used space, but I have not put nothing on it yet, at most there should only be some KB used space, so I have no clue why it is doing this?
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by:Snowguy
ID: 10698411
From your screen shot it looks like you are running ME?
If so you will have a recycle bin and it is also monitored by system restore this would be stored on the drive.
You can check by disabling system restore.
Also under folder options tick show all files. As what is on the drive is hidden. This will alow you to see what is taking up the space.
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audiodog earned 125 total points
ID: 10700062
dllfile,

The reason that you have occupied space after the creation of a partition is due to the partition itself.  The file/drive/storage partition is easier to understand if you can imagine a filing cabinet, especially if you think of directories as folders.  Imagine that each filing cabinet drawer represents a drive's partition.  Depending upon the size cabinet, or drive, you have a finite or fixed amount of storage space.  The drawer is a physical entity, and thus occupies space even when there is nothing within it's cavity.  The same is true of a Partition Table.

The partition consists of a number of files which are not normally viewable through the Operating System.  Although it can be viewed when using a third-party application which is capable of reading the entire contents of a drive through running within the OS, i.e. a Data Receovery Utility.  In order for a Partition to be able to store data, it must consist of the type of data allocated to the drive.  Allocated data is stored by specific standards, and we refer to these as FAT16, FAT16(HUGE), FAT32, NTFS, HPFS, and so on.

Once the way in which data will be stored is determined, the next step is to determine the physical location for the data.  This is referred to as mapping the drive.  When mapping the drive, there is often an option to determine the cluster size, or the amount of physical space required to store a specific amount of hexidecimal data, i.e. bits.  Since drive manufacturers refer to storage volume dependent on a single bit, and not that as a software bit, a completed partition can have less than what was listed by the manufacturer's specifications.  However it is not related to the Partition Table information.

After the drive has been mapped, we now have a file specifying the physical starting location for storing information, and the physical ending location for storing information.  Without this "map" the ability to retrieve stored data is impossible.  So we now find that there is a Partition Table which specifies volume size, reference points, and the location of the PRIMARY DIRECTORY.  The Primary Directory is identified by both/either the OS and BIOS with a Drive letter.  Unlike a FAT32 Partition Table, a NTFS Partition Table has what you can think of as it's own index file.  Within it's index is information on the location of directories, files, and if they are encrypted.  The increased security and stability of a NTFS Partition Table is due to the loss of space after formatting, or mapping, the hard drive.

If you think of a NTFS Partition as a NT FILE SYSTEM, you can simply imagine that the OS is located in a directory within a directory.  The best, and possibly easiest way to verify this is to change the size of your partition.  Regardless of partition size, you should read little to no difference in the amount of space used by the NTFS Partition.  If you are concerned about the loss of space, then you might wish to consider formatting the partition as a FAT16(HUGE).  This type of partition supports the NT-based versions of Windows, i.e. 2000 and XP, but also allows for data compression.  In a FAT16(HUGE) Partition data can be reduced through a compression algorithm, but does not require uncompression to allow the data to run.  Again, this would not be possible if the partition did not contain it's own information of the data stored within the drive.  So the lost space you are referring to is actually in fact the PARTITION itself.

I hope that this answered your question, but if you need any additional clarification, please feel free to contact me.  Audiodog.
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by:dllfile
ID: 10700577
excellent, I have been sitting here wondering for a while now why it was doing this, I noticed before using an updated fdisk for large partitions I made it a fat32 drive and it did not have used space, but since I wanted ntfs, i delted and remade it as ntfs, but was showing 60-67MB used space and was wondering why, but I think I understand now. Thnx alot for your help, // Cheers, dllfile
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