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satishinspire asked on

unix files systems

how unix file systems are different from windows.
what is the prime area of difference . is unix a better operating system than windows ?
Unix OS

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Alf666

8/22/2022 - Mon
ahoffmann

> is unix a better operating system than windows ?
hmm, you can read infinite articles and books about this, and its always the same: each author has its preferences
so simply make your own decision *after* reading at least a few dozent texts about that

> how unix file systems are different from windows.
there're dozents of Unix filesystems, compared to roiughly 3 or 4 on Windows
So, which one do you mean?
The main difference is that Unix uses kernel driver which are independent of the Unix flabiour, mainly
while in windows it's part of the OS.
Alf666

ntfs is a good file system. FAT or FAT32 is BAAAAD.

ntfs and ext2 (the usual linux file system) could be compared.

But now, most linux flavors come with journaled filesystems, though avoiding the need for file system checks on reboot.

Such filesystems are, for example : ext3, reiserfs.
mdhmi


... is unix a better operating system than windows ?

I normally don't respond to questions this lame, but, here goes: YES !.

Mark

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rwheeler23
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Hanno P.S.

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Hanno P.S.

Addition to "journalling":
Solaris' UFS has journaling built in since Solaris 8 (can be enabled/disabled using mount option)
And AFS has journalling, too ;-)

Thanks for your additions, ahoffmann.
sanal

1. Windows has various file systems like FAT, FAT32, NTFS
NTFS is a better and secure file system out of these three.  
Windows uses the Drive and Directory concepts. Like you boot parition is C:   under C: you have a lot of directories. Like this you can have multiple drives and directories. This is easy to arrange your files in different drives.  If you have NTFS file system, you can restrict access to each and every directory. The GUI for windows is very user friendly.
The applications on windows uses directories, files, configuration files, and registry.  The registry becomes larger when you install many applications.  The more application you install, your system will become slower.  Once in a year you most probably have to reinstall windows and all applications because of performance problems.

Unix uses the concept of File system structure.  It uses directories and files.  The OS is part of kernel, which is more rigid compared to windows, applications are installed above that, so there are less chances for a crash.  In pleace of drive letters it uses different filesystems/partitions which is listed under / (root). Bit complicated for a layman.  But good for an organization where lots of application are using and stability is required.  The graphics is not so user friendly.  Since unix doesn't use registry, it doesn't need a reinstall every few months.  Software installed uses only configuration files and other files and directories.

If you are thinking or home use or a home office, i would suggest you to use windows only.
Alf666

Lots of answers for a 50 points question :-)
Though the author does not seem very interested by them.
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